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Constance Walter

Five undergraduate students recently completed their 10-week internships at Sanford Lab, an experience that will offer each many opportunities.

?Internships help students put real-world work experience on their resumes and decide if their chosen field is the right career path for them,? said Bryce Pietzyk, Senior Underground Operations Engineer. Pietzyk supervised Zane Boldon, a South Dakota School of Mines & Technology mining engineering student. ?We were really pleased with his work,? Pietzyk said. 

Boldon and Daniel Johnson each received Chris Bauer Engineering internships, which were created three years ago in honor of the late Sanford Lab Electrical Engineer. Boldon spent most of his time underground studying the efficiency of the Fletcher bolter, participated in the annual level inspection, and helped create a reservoir on the 4100 Level. ?This was a great opportunity for me,? Boldon said. 

Johnson, an electrical engineering major at South Dakota State University, said the internship has helped him ?grow immensely? in his field. Johnson worked with Electrical Engineer Paul Bauer to design a control system for a liquid nitrogen filling system for the Black Hills State University Underground Campus. 

Last week, each intern gave a presentation focusing on the work they did at Sanford Lab. Julie Bauer, Chris Bauer?s widow, and her daughters Tessa and Emma attended the event. 

?Listening to the presentations reveals a bit of the extensive variety and value of experiences offered to the interns,? she said. ?They work at a world-class laboratory where science is advancing our understanding of the universe. We cannot imagine a better memorial to Chris, who was extremely proud to be a part of this facility.?

Three interns received Dave Bozied internships, which are funded by the South Dakota Science and Technology Authority and named for the former SDSTA Board Member. Ida Clark, an environmental and physical science major at BHSU, spent her summer at the Waste Water Treatment Plant; while Jacob Haivala, a chemical engineering major at Montana State, and Joseph VanDriel, a physics major at SDSMT, worked with the science groups in the Davis Campus. 

Johnson said he would encourage other students to apply for internships at Sanford Lab. ?Besides being one of the leading science facilities in the world, it?s just a really cool place to work?interesting and unique.?