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ESH Manual Page: 2000: Construction and Contractor Safety

Acronyms

  • ACGIH ? American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists
  • ACM ? Asbestos-Containing Material
  • ASHRAE -- American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers
  • JHA ? Job Hazard Analysis
  • AL ? Action Level
  • ALARA ? As Low As Reasonably Achievable
  • ANSI ? American National Standards Institute
  • APCD ? Air Pollution Control Division (Colorado)
  • ASME ? American Society of Mechanical Engineers
  • ASTM ? American Society for Testing and Materials
  • BM ? Building Area Engineer
  • BBP ? Blood Borne Pathogen
  • BMPs ? Best Management Practices
  • CEHSP ? Contractor?s Environmental Health and Safety Plan
  • CERCLA -- Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act
  • CFR ? Code of Federal Regulations
  • CPR ? Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
  • CSE ? Confined Space Entry
  • CWA ? Clean Water Act
  • dB ? decibels
  • dBA ? decibels, A-weighted scale
  • DOP - Di-Octyl Phthalate
  • DOE ? Department of Energy
  • FM ? Factory Mutual
  • ECT ? Equivalent Chill Temperature
  • EAP?Employee Assistance Program
  • EHS ? Environment, Health and Safety
  • EPA ? Environmental Protection Agency
  • ESWP ? Electrical Safe Work Permit
  • FHA ? Fall Hazard Analysis
  • GFCI ? Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter
  • HAZCOM ? Hazard Communication
  • HCP ? Hazard Communication Program
  • HEPA ? High Efficiency Particulate Absolute
  • HPD ? Hearing Protection Device
  • H&R ? Hoisting and Rigging
  • IBC ? International Building Code
  • IH ? Industrial Hygiene
  • IPT ? Integrated Project Team
  • LO/TO ? Lock-out / Tag-out
  • mA ? milliamps
  • MSDS ? Material Safety Data Sheet
  • NCCCO -- National Commission for the Certification of Crane Operators
  • NEPA ? National Environmental Policy Act
  • NFPA ? National Fire Protection Association
  • NIST ? National Institute of Science and Technology
  • NPDES ? National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System
  • OEL ? Occupational Exposure Limit
  • ORM ? South Dakota Office of Risk Management
  • OSHA ? Occupational Safety and Health Act, or Occupational Safety and Health Administration
  • PAI ? Permit Authorizing Individual
  • PEL ? Permissible Exposure Limit
  • PFAS ? Personal Fall Arrest System
  • PHA ? Preliminary Hazard Analysis
  • POC ? Point of Contact
  • POD ?Plan of the Day
  • PPE ? Personal Protective Equipment
  • RCRA ? Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
  • RFP ? Request for Proposal
  • RSO ? Radiation Safety Officer
  • SDSTA -- South Dakota Science and Technology Authority (Legal name of the entity that governs SURF) a quasi-governmental entity created by an Act of the SD Legislature to facilitate science research at the former Homestake Mine in Lead
  • SLM ? Sound Level Meter
  • SURF ? Sanford Underground Research Facility
  • SWPPP ? Strom Water Pollution Prevention Plan
  • TLV ? Threshold Limit Value
  • TWA ? Time Weighted Average
  • UL ? Underwriter?s Laboratory
  • USC?United States Code
1.0 Introduction

The Construction Environment, Health & Safety (CEHS) Manual (hereafter referred to as ?this Manual?) has been developed to identify the minimum requirements for Construction Contractors and their lower-tier Sub-contractors (hereafter referred to as ?Contractor?) which require personnel to perform construction activities at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) Site.

1.1 Background

It is OSHA policy that all employers provide a safe and healthful workplace for their personnel. Each Contractor is responsible for ensuring compliance with all applicable requirements that govern their work at SURF facilities, including any consensus standards incorporated therein by reference.

1.2 Definitions

Job Hazard Analysis: A work control document that identifies the work tasks, hazards and controls of the work to be performed; and is conveyed to the workers for review, input, acceptance and adherence.

Competent Person: One who is capable of identifying existing and predictable hazards in the surroundings or working conditions which are unsanitary, hazardous, or dangerous to employees, and who has authorization to take prompt, corrective measures to eliminate them. A Competent Person is also one who has extensive training knowledge/experience in a particular activity or job function. A Competent Person at SURF shall be capable of demonstrating the? knowledge and skill-sets? that match their ?Competent Person? designation.

Construction Activity: Any combination of erection, installation, assembly, demolition, or fabrication activities involved to create a new facility or to alter, add to, rehabilitate, dismantle, or remove an existing facility. It also includes the alteration and repair (including dredging, excavating, and painting) of buildings, structures, or other real property, as well as any construction, demolition, and excavation activities conducted as part of environmental restoration or remediation efforts.

Construction Contractor: A person, corporation, or other entity, other than the prime contractor (SDSTA), who furnishes labor, supplies, materials, equipment, or services in furtherance of the SURF?s mission under a construction or similar contract with SDSTA including a task order agreement. A Contractor's construction site tenure may vary depending on the nature of the project, and its employees are not considered a permanent construction force.

Construction Environmental, Health and Safety Plan (CEHSP): A document prepared by the construction Contractor and submitted to the SURF EHS Office and Project Manager for review and concurrence. It describes the construction Contractor's environmental, health, and safety plan for a particular construction project and the Job Hazards Analysis for each definable activity/feature of work.

Construction Project Manager (SURF). Engineer, building manager, technical monitor, or SURF-delegated representative authorized to approve and accept work, provide technical liaison, and interpret SURF plans and specifications on behalf of SURF.

Contractor Safety Officer/Representative: An employee of the construction Contractor at the work site who is responsible for assisting in the implementation of the Contractors CEHSP and compliance with applicable laws and regulations. The required qualifications of the Contractor?s Safety Officer/Representative shall be spelled out in the contract EHS requirements. The qualifications of each individual filling these rolls shall be listed in the CEHSP. For some projects, the project specifications may dictate that the Contractor have the full-time on-site services of a more highly qualified individual (e.g. - Certified Safety Professional, Safety Trained Supervisor, etc.).

Contract Administrator: A South Dakota Science and Technology Authority (SDSTA) employee who is authorized to award and administer a subcontract on behalf of the SDSTA.

Control: A measure implemented to mitigate a hazard (eg. engineering control, administrative control, or PPE).

Graded Approach: The process of applying a level of rigor commensurate with the importance or significance of the activity, in relation to the associated hazards and consequences to ensure that available resources are used most efficiently and effectively. A Graded Approach is recommended for implementing the work planning and control (i.e. ? the CEHS Plan and accompanying JHAs). The level of detail within each CEHS Project Plan and corresponding JHA should be based on the size, complexity and risk level of the construction project.

Hold Point: A point of defined circumstances (i.e. Excavation Permit) beyond which a construction activity must not proceed without the approval of a designated authority (ie. the Permit Authorizing Individual (PAI) or third party reviewer for a hot work permit).

Imminent Danger: A condition or practice that could reasonably be expected to cause death or serious injury, severe property damage, or environmental impairment unless immediate actions are taken to mitigate the effects of the hazard created.

Near Miss (Major): An event where no barrier or only one barrier prevented a major incident or serious injury.

Near Miss (Minor): An event where no barrier or only one barrier prevented a minor incident or injury.

Preliminary Hazard Analysis: Initial evaluation of the construction site (conditions and processes) and work scope to assess known and anticipated hazards and to identify potential mitigations prior to implementation.

Qualified Person: One who by possession of a recognized degree, certificate, or professional standing, or who by extensive knowledge, training, and experience, has successfully demonstrated his ability to solve or resolve problems relating to the subject matter, the work, or the construction project.

Worker: A leased worker, Contractor, independent contractor/consultant, volunteer, or other individual providing construction services to SURF or working at the SURF site.

1.3 Layout and Use of this Manual ? Imperative Information

1.3.1 Scope

This Manual contains excerpts from, and references to, numerous regulations, codes, and standards which are not presented in their entirety. Similarly, not all Environmental, Health, and Safety subject matter is covered in this Manual. Each Contractor is responsible for ensuring compliance with all applicable requirements that govern their work at SURF facilities, including any consensus standards incorporated therein by reference. If the Manual does not contain information relative to a particular Environmental, Health or Safety topic, the Contractor shall ensure that the governing regulatory provisions or national consensus standards as applicable are implemented as part of their CEHS Plan. If there is a conflict between requirements, the Contractor is to apply the most stringent unless otherwise directed by the SURF Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) point of contact (POC). Contractors are always encouraged to apply best management practices in all of their endeavors.

1.3.2 Layout of this Manual

The chapters in this Manual are arranged according to topic area and, in general, are laid out in the same format. The chapter will identify to whom the requirements apply, the broad regulatory drivers and the Contractor?s responsibilities.

Each chapter will also identify any requirements that are specific to the SURF site. Also presented in each chapter are issues of special emphasis that SURF has identified or for which additional risk control mechanisms are required (i.e. ? safety plans that shall be submitted for review and approval by the Environmental Health and Safety group, or permits that shall be obtained prior to performing work, etc.).

It is the responsibility of the Contractor to know, understand and plan for SURF-specific requirements/special emphasis programs. SURF-specific requirements may affect what the Contractor includes in their Job Hazard Analyses, impact how the Contractor conducts their work, or may affect their project schedule.

2.0 General Requirements

2.1 Applicability

The requirements of this Manual apply to all Construction Contractors performing construction activities on the SURF Site.

This Manual provides requirements for identifying key aspects of the Contractor environmental, health and safety policies to provide all employees a safe and healthful workplace while also protecting the environment in compliance with recognized regulatory requirements.

2.2 Regulatory Requirements

The SURF facilities are owned by the South Dakota Science and Technology Authority, a quasi-governmental entity, and as such, adheres to the State?s tobacco free policy. While the enforcement provisions of the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) of 1970 do not apply, the state Office of Risk Management (ORM) has exercised its statutory authority to prescribe that all Contractors comply with the OSHA Safety and Health Standards for General Industry (29 CFR 1910) and Construction (29 CFR 1926) and SURF will enforce compliance with the following standards:

  1. Work Place Safety

29 CFR 1910

Occupational Safety and Health Standards

29 CFR 1926

Safety and Health Regulations for Construction

30 CFR

MSHA

2.0 Building Codes

18 USC Chapter 40

Explosives

ANSI Z358.1-2009

Emergency Eyewash and Shower Equipment

ANSI/ASHRAE 62-2004

Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality

ASME

(Sections I through XII including applicable Code Cases)

Boilers and Pressure Vessel Code,

ASME B31.1 (i)

Power Piping

ASME B31.2 (ii)

Fuel Gas Piping

ASME B31.3 (iii)

Process Piping

ASME B31.4 (iv)

Pipeline Transportation Systems for Liquid Components

ASME B31.5 (v)

Refrigeration Piping and Heat Transfer Components

ASME

Cranes and Hoist Standards

IBC 2009

Building Codes

NFPA 101

Life Safety Code

NFPA 110

Emergency and Standby Power Systems

NFPA 45

Fire Protection for Laboratories Using Chemicals

NFPA 520

Standard on Subterranean Spaces

NFPA 70 B

Recommended Practice for Electrical Equipment Maintenance

NFPA 70 E

Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace

NFPA 70

National Electrical Code

NFPA 780

Standard for the Installation of Lightning Protection Systems (and UL86A)

SD Lead City Ordinance

Occupational Noise Exposure

Fermilab Policy

Oxygen Deficiency Hazards (ODH)

 

3.0 Environmental and Waste Management

10 CFR 1021

National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures

40 CFR 112

Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure Procedures

40 CFR 260-279

Protection of Environment- Hazardous Waste Management System (Hazardous Waste Regulations)

40 CFR 262.11

Hazardous Waste Determination

40 CFR 273

Standard for Universal Waste Management

40 CFR761

Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCB)

40 CRF 280

Underground Storage Tanks

40 CFR 302 (CERCLA)

Designation, Reportable Quantities, and Notification

40 CFR 370

Hazardous Chemical Reporting, Community Right to Know

40 CFR 61, Subpart A

National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants

40 CFR 122

NPDES system

40 CFR 136

Guidelines Establishing Test Procedures for the Analysis of Pollutants

49 CFR 171-180

Hazardous Materials Transportation Act

SD Article 12:62

Weed and Pest Control

4.0 South Dakota DENR: Codified Law

34-44

Asbestos Abatement Training Project

34A-1

Air Pollution Control

34A-2

Water Pollution Control

34A-3A

Safe Drinking Water

34A-6

Solid Waste Management

34A-9

Environmental Impact of Government Actions

34A-11

Hazardous Waste Management

34A-13

Petroleum Inspection and Release Compensation

46-1

Definitions and General Provisions (Water Rights)

46-2A

Administrative Procedure for Appropriate Water

46-5

Appropriation of Water

46-6

Groundwater and wells

 

5.0 South Dakota Administrative Rule:

 

74:36

Air Pollution

74:31

Asbestos Control Program

74:50

Compliance Procedures for Water Pollution

74:54

Groundwater Quality

74:28

Hazardous Waste

74:32

Petroleum Inspection and Release Compensation

74:34

Regulated Substance Discharge

74:27

Solid Waste

74:51

Surface Water Quality

74:52

Surface Water Discharge Permits

74:55

Underground Injection Control

74:04

Water Hygiene

74:50

Compliance Procedures For Water Pollution Control

74:53

Water Supply and treatment Systems

74:21

Water Systems Operators

74:02

Water Rights

6.0 Reference Standards

ANSI 31.9-1996

Building Services Piping

ANSI C2

National Electrical Safety Code

NFPA 10

Portable Fire Extinguishers

NFPA 13

Automatic Sprinklers

NFPA 14

Standpipe and Hose Systems

NFPA 30

Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code

NFPA 55

Standard for the Storage, Use, and Handling of Compressed Gases and Cryogenic Fluids in Portable and Stationary Containers, Cylinders, and Tanks.

NFPA 72

National Fire Alarm Code

7.0 Additional Standards

The following is a selection of additional trade organizations and standards that may govern the selection and installation of products on the SURF project.

ACGIH Ventilation Manual

Air Movement and Control Association (AMCA)

The Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI)

American Concrete Institute (ACI) ? ACI-318

American Gas Association (AGA)

American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) ? Manual of Steel Construction

American National Standards Institute (ANSI)

American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM)

American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE)

American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)

American Society of Plumbing Engineers (ASPE)

American Society of Sanitary Engineering (ASSE)

American Water Works Association (AWWA)

Factory Mutual (FM)

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)

Insulated Cable Engineers Association (ICEA)

Manufacturers Standardization Society (MSS)

Mechanical Contractors Association of America (MCAA)

National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA)

National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA)

National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)

National Institute of Standards & Technology (NIST)

National Sanitation Foundation (NSF)

Plumbing & Drainage Institute (PDI)

Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors National Association (SMACNA) Standards

Underwriters Laboratories, Inc. (UL)

Water Conditioning Foundation (WCF)

2.3 SURF Specific Requirements

2.3.1 Construction EHS Plan

Each Contractor performing construction work at SURF, not classified as ?Owner Escorted?, is required to develop a Construction Environmental, Health & Safety Plan (CEHSP) prior to conducting any work activities on site (see ?Contract Safety Language Variations?). The Contractor shall ensure that the requirements in this Manual and the specific Contract Safety Language included in its contract are incorporated into its CEHSP and the associated Job Hazard Analyses (JHA?s). The CEHSP shall be submitted in accordance with the contract requirements document and shall undergo a review and concurrence by the SURF Project Manager and the EHS POC prior to the Contractor being allowed to start work. For ?Owner Escorted? work the Contractor will be accompanied by a SURF escort and will follow SURF Policy and Procedure. The escort will be with the Contractor at all times that the Contractor is on site and will ensure compliance with SURF policies and procedures.

SURF will provide each Contractor with a link to an electronic copy of the CEHSP template that shall be utilized for their Plan. A new CEHSP shall be submitted for each construction project, regardless of whether the Contractor has performed prior work at SURF. The template is provided in electronic format to enable cut-and-paste functions for those Contractors whose basic data remains unchanged, yet tailor the hazard and controls information to the particular activities/materials/location of the project at-hand. Similarly, the core safety management mechanism, the Job Hazard Analysis, is provided in electronic format to make production of the JHA as easy as possible yet project specific (see section 4.3).

SURF recommends using a graded approach in the development of CEHSP?s. This approach determines the level of rigor for implementing the work planning and control attributes based on the importance/significance of the activity in relation to the associated hazards and consequences. The level of detail within each CEHSP and corresponding JHA should be commensurate with the size, complexity and risk level of the construction project.

Field changes (i.e., red line, pen/ink changes) to the CEHSP are acceptable. The updated documents shall be reviewed and concurred with by the SURF Project Manager and the EHS POC prior to implementation. All affected Contractor personnel involved in the work being performed shall review the amended documents and sign a ?Job Briefing Attendance? form prior to work commencing. The CEHSP shall be kept at the worksite and available for review.

2.3.2 Training and Documentation

All persons contracted to perform work on site at SURF are required to attend a Contractor Safety Orientation prior to performing any work on-site. The General Contractor Safety Orientation is a 1.5 hour training class provided by SURF. There is no cost to the Contractor for this training.

SURF specific training required by Contractors will be determined from information contained in the Contractor?s site specific safety program. SURF will also provide this training at no cost to the Contractor.

For work activities in which specific training is required by safety regulations (e.g., OSHA mandated), the Contractor shall maintain records on-site, showing proof of current training records for any particular qualified individual(s). Designated ?Competent Persons? are expected to have a higher level of experience, training and qualification. Contractors shall have in place a mechanism to verify that the ?Competent Person(s)? knowledge and skill-sets match their ?Competent Person? designation (i.e., written test).

Photocopies of training certificates, certification cards, wallet IDs, etc. identifying the individual, the specific training, who conducted the training and the date completed (and/or expiration date) are accepted in lieu of originals.

In addition, SURF may require some projects to have specific qualifications for their designated on-site safety offier/representative (e.g. ? 10 or 30-hour Construction Safety, Safety Trained Supervisor, Board of Certified Safety Professionals Certification), depending upon the complexity of the project and the hazards involved. SURF will identify this requirement in the request for proposal.

2.3.3 Safety Bulletin Boards

The Contractor is responsible for installing and maintaining a safety bulletin board at the location where the majority of employees report to work. Workers shall be advised of the location of the nearest bulletin board. Employees shall be responsible for reviewing the bulletin board to keep informed of safety-related information. Safety bulletin boards shall be sufficient size to display and post safety bulletins, newsletters, posters, accident statistics, and other safety educational material. At a minimum, the safety bulletin board shall display:

  • State of South Dakota Department of Labor, Employee Rights Poster
  • Requirements, provisions and number of the Employee Concern Program Hotline (Whistleblower Protection)
  • Citations and notices as appropriate
  • OSHA 300A form during February 1 to April 30
  • SURF -furnished safety bulletins and publications

Suggested additional items to be posted include:

  • Topical Safety & Health posters.
  • Minutes of safety meetings.
  • Information on accidents and Lessons Learned
  • Hazard communication information.

2.3.4 Project Implementation (Phased Mobilization)

To ensure compliance with all regulations during mobilization the Contractor will be required to mobilize in phases. As each phase is completed EHS approval will be required to enter the next phase. The Phases and associated approvals are as follows:

  1. EHS Documents. (CEHSP with Safety Officer/Safety Representative qualification and Preliminary Job Hazard Analysis)
    1. EHS to verify phase complete prior to work starting.
  2. Employee Site Specific Training and other necessary training complete and documentation received.
    1. EHS to verify that the Contractor has provided the necessary training for workers or its employees possess the appropriate certificates of training prior to Contractor moving onsite.
  3. Work Site Set-up. (fire extinguishers, first aid station, ingress/egress, access controls, PPE, establish on-site office, mobilize equipment and supplies for job)
    1. EHS to do a site inspection to verify controls are in place and training documentation is on site for workers prior to work commencing.
  4. Start of Work.
    1. Plan of the Day (POD) Meeting/Toolbox Safety Talk and JHA Review Prior to each shift.
    2. Pre-shift ?fit-for-duty? evaluation shall be conducted by the Contractor for all workers.

2.3.5 Employee Check-in and Accountability

The Contractor shall document daily, at its pre-shift toolbox talk, all personnel, including subcontractors, present on site at SURF and shall pass that information to the Laboratory Receptionist on a SURF ?Contractors Check-in Log? for inclusion in the master check-in log. The Contractor shall also maintain accountability for these individuals throughout the shift and, in the event of an emergency or evacuation drill, shall be able to verify that all individuals are accounted for.

2.3.6 Incident Response and Notification

The Contractor shall train its personnel and subcontractors? personnel on the SURF Emergency Response Plan (ERP) and shall maintain a copy of the ERP at the work site. The Contractor shall report all incidents and near misses, no matter how minor, to the SURF Project Manager and/or the EHS Point of Contact (POC) as soon as the scene is stabilized, but in all cases notification shall be made within one hour of occurrence. This reporting time frame is necessary in order that stakeholders in the SURF facility can be notified within prescribed time requirements and so that any necessary accident investigation, scene security, cleanup, ventilation changes, traffic rerouting, etc. may begin.

For all emergencies at the SURF site, the Contractor shall:

  • Call 911[from Laboratory phones call 9-911] (only for emergencies on the surface that require fire or emergency medical services)
  • Call the hoist operator [Yates (605) 722-1037 ? Ross (605) 722-4881] (only for underground emergencies)
  • Call (605) 641-0118 ? SURF Emergency Response Coordinator

Refer to: SURF Emergency Reporting Procedures in DocuShare

The Contractor is expected to submit a preliminary accident investigation report following the occurrence of any personal injury on the SURF site within 24 hours. A detailed report is required within 4 days of the occurrence. The SURF EHS POC is available to assist the Contractor in the development of the detailed accident investigation report.

A site map showing assembly points and directions to the Contractor?s authorized medical facility shall be posted on site at the project location (e.g., site project office) and be included as a part of the CEHS Project Plan. (This should be the last page of the CEHS Project Plan to facilitate ease of retrieval). A copy shall also be posted at the Contractor?s project field office. Upon award of the work, the Contractor shall contact the Project Manager or EHS POC for electronic copies of building evacuation routes and assembly areas to include in the CEHS Plan?s map(s), as needed.

2.3.7 Evacuation Drill Participation

The contractor acknowledges that periodic drills and exercises are required by SURF to validate the adequacy and effectiveness of SURF?s Emergency Response Plan. The Contractor also recognizes that such drills and exercises enhance its employees? understanding of SURF?s Emergency Response Plan. The Contractor agrees to participate in quarterly drills (underground) and bi-annual drills (surface), which may or may not be scheduled in advance, during the term of this contract. It is understood that the Contractor will not be entitled to any additional compensation for participating in these drills or exercises.

The Contractor agrees to assess whether its workers have the physical, mental, and emotional capacity to perform assigned tasks competently, and in a manner that does not unreasonably threaten safety, health, or property, including participation in emergency procedures applicable to the Contractor?s work location.

2.3.8 Tobacco Use

The Contractor shall enforce a tobacco-free environment on their work site. All property owned or operated by the Authority shall be tobacco-free. This includes all buildings, grounds, parking lots, Authority-owned motor vehicles (whether on Authority property or not) and any other motor vehicle on Authority property. This applies to all areas on the surface and underground.

2.3.9 Alcohol and Controlled Substances Policy

The Contractor shall enforce a zero tolerance policy in regards to working under the influence of alcohol or use of controlled substances by its employees and employees of subcontractors.

2.4 SURF Special Emphasis

2.4.1 Integrated Safety Management(ISM) System

The Contractor shall incorporate the elements of Integrated Safety Management (ISM) into its CEHSP that conforms to SURF ISM requirements. An effective ISM plan establishes a single system that integrates requirements to protect the workers, public, and the environment into their work planning and execution process. The five core ISM functions for work activities that could potentially affect workers, the public, or the environment, and applies them as a continuous cycle with the degree of rigor appropriate to address the type of work activity and the hazards involved are:

  • Define the Scope of Work. Translate missions into work, set expectations, identify and prioritize tasks, and allocate resources.
  • Analyze the Hazards. Identify, analyze, and categorize hazards and potential environmental impacts associated with the work.
  • Develop and Implement Hazard Controls. Identify and agree upon standards and requirements, identify controls to prevent/mitigate hazards, establish the EHS parameters, and implement controls.
  • Perform Work Within Controls. Confirm readiness and perform work safely and in the prescribed manner to protect workers, the public, and the environment.
  • Provide Feedback and Continuous Improvement. Gather feedback on the adequacy of controls from workers and appropriate stakeholders, identify and implement opportunities for improvement, and conduct line management and independent oversight.

Contractor program flexibility is understood and encouraged as long as the Contractor?s program tenets adequately address the spirit and intent of the ISM provisions. For specific information on instituting an ISM program, refer to DOE document, DOE M 450.4-1, Integrated Safety Management System Manual. https://www.directives.doe.gov/directives/0450.4-DManual-1/view

2.4.2 Stop Work Authority

If unanticipated/unsafe conditions are identified or non-compliant practices are observed during construction activities, workers shall be instructed to stop the work immediately and notify their supervisor and health & safety officer of this action. All workers, including contractors, at SURF sites have the authority and responsibility to stop work. Work may not proceed until the circumstances are investigated and deficiencies corrected.

2.5 General Contractor Responsibilities

As required by OSHA, the Contractor shall establish a worker safety and health program. Worker protection measures should be based on the use of a graded approach to ensure that available resources are used most efficiently and effectively. Worker safety and health programs shall be integrated into other related site-specific worker protection activities and within the integrated safety management system. There must be an open and continuous line of communication between the Contractor and SURF to discuss any unsafe acts or conditions that may arise during the project. The basis for the implementation of the Contractor Worker Safety and Health Program will be contained in the CEHSP.

The Contractor has overall accountability for the safety of its project and shall allocate the resources necessary for implementing all required safety-related codes and contract/subcontract requirements. The Contractor shall:

  • Follow all SURF site specific environmental, health and safety (EHS) requirements and associated permits as defined by this Manual.
  • Establish EHS flow-down requirements in all subcontracts.
  • Provide assurance that lower tier subcontractors are following flow down requirements.
  • Implement the appropriate requirements of this Manual into the CEHSP.
  • Designate a Contractor Safety Officer/designated on-site safety representative to oversee all activities as required by SURF EHS.
  • Develop, implement, and/or adhere to Job Hazards Analysis (JHA) and other pre-job planning documents required by this Manual.
  • Provide training to employees in safe-work practices.
  • Document all required training and have available on site for review.
  • Provide required personal protective equipment (PPE), training employees on how to use the equipment and enforcing its use in the field.
  • Monitor the workplace for unsafe conditions and take immediate action to correct unsafe conditions, acts, and other deficiencies identified during inspections.
  • Perform necessary personal exposure monitoring.
  • Coordinate and conduct pre-job planning with other contractors, subcontractors, field supervisors, affected lab managers, and others, as required.
  • Conduct a daily walk-around safety inspection.
  • Conduct a weekly site inspection, accompanied by the SURF project manager and the SURF EHS POC, and provide documentation of this inspection to the SURF EHS POC as outlined in Chapter 4 of this Manual.
  • Provide SURF EHS POC with a weekly EHS Report as outlined in Chapter 4 of this Manual
  • Instruct all employees, initially and periodically, on matters pertaining to employee safety and health rights, protections, obligations, and responsibilities.
  • Maintain a safety bulletin board as specified in this Manual.
3.0 Construction Hazard Identification and Control Process

3.1 Regulatory Requirements

Contractor methods for identifying, controlling, and documenting hazards associated with Contractor work activities shall be conducted in accordance with the statutory requirements as listed in Chapter 2 of this Manual.

3.2 SURF Specific Requirements/Permits

In addition to Section 3.1, all Contractor work activities shall meet the following specific SURF requirements for hazard identification and control.

3.2.1 General Requirements

The Contractor is responsible for understanding the scope of work in sufficient detail to ensure that the work is effectively planned for each definable work activity, the hazards associated with the work are identified and the planned protective measures are implemented. This shall be accomplished utilizing the Job Hazard Analysis (JHA) process described in Section 3.2.2 below. These analyses shall be listed in the CEHSP. The CEHSP template provides additional guidance on developing JHA?s, in addition to completed example JHA templates to assist the Contractor in the development of its JHA?s.

3.2.2 Job Hazard Analyses

For each separately definable construction activity (e.g., excavations, foundations, structural steel, roofing, electrical, mechanical, etc.) the Contractor shall develop a Job Hazard Analysis (JHA) prior to commencement of the associated work/definable feature. A definable work activity is a task which is separate and distinct from other tasks, and has separate control requirements. A definable work activity may be identified by different trades or disciplines, or it may be work by the same trade in a different environment. Within each definable work activity there may be other sub-phases of work which warrant separate JHAs. It will be the responsibility of the Contractor to determine the best break-down of separately definable activities and the subsequent work steps in order to produce clear, concise, and effective, JHAs. The Contractor JHAs shall be kept at the worksite and available for review by SURF.

SURF recommends using a graded approach in the development of JHAs; however, the Contractor JHA?s shall be developed in sufficient detail to preclude confusion and misunderstanding and shall be commensurate with the size, complexity and risk level of the construction project. When used appropriately, the graded approach will incorporate the level of rigor for implementing the work planning and control attributes based on the importance/significance of the activity in relation to the associated hazards and consequences.

The analyses shall contain and/or meet the following elements as applicable to the activity:

  • Identification of the definable work activity:
  • Identification of the job steps for each work activity
  • Identification of the foreseeable hazards for each step/activity and the planned protective measures to include appropriate protective devices and/or equipment as needed
  • Identification of competent persons required for workplace inspections of the construction activity, where required by OSHA standards
  • Identification of Emergency Response Action relative information. (e.g., gas shutoff valve location, etc.).
  • Identification of project-required hold-points or other logistical requirements.
  • Identification of additional hazards revealed by supplemental site information (e.g., site characterization data, as-built drawings)
  • Drawings and/or other documentation of protective measures for which applicable OSHA standards require preparation by a Professional Engineer or other qualified professional
  • Review and approval of the JHA by the Contractor?s Project Manager,
  • Review and concurrence by the SURF Project Manager and SURF EHS POC prior to the start of work activities.
  • Places for signatures of the involved workers. Attach additional signature pages as needed.

The completed JHA shall be approved by the SURF Project Manager/designee and the contractor with concurrence by the SURF EHS POC.

The Contractor shall conduct a pre-task/phase meeting that discusses the corresponding JHA, the work tasks, and associated procedures and hazards with all affected parties to identify and coordinate logistics, controls and communications required for the activity. Each worker involved in that work must sign the JHA ?Job Briefing Attendance? sheet prior to performing work to signify they have been briefed on and understand the requirements of the JHA, and acknowledge their intended compliance with the JHA. All JHAs must be kept at the work site to be available for review by workers and oversight personnel.

If, while working, it is discovered that the controls addressed in the JHA will not/do not provide adequate protection, then the task at hand shall be stopped and not be conducted until the hazards have been re-assessed, the JHA updated, and adequate controls implemented. In these instances, the Contractor may utilize field changes (i.e., red line, pen/ink changes) as needed to reflect changing conditions associated with the activity. The updated JHA shall be made available for review and concurrence to the SURF Project Manager and EHS POC prior to implementation. All affected Contractor personnel involved in the work being performed shall review each JHA and subsequent updates/changes.

3.2.3 Worker Training

The Contractor shall ensure that affected workers are made aware of the foreseeable hazards and the protective measures described within the activity analysis prior to beginning work on the affected activity.

3.2.4 Record of Training

The Contractor shall ensure that workers acknowledge being informed of the hazards and protective measures associated with assigned work activities and understand those requirements. Each worker involved in that work must sign the JHA ?Job Briefing Attendance? sheet prior to performing work.

3.3 Contractor Responsibilities

3.3.1 Contractor?s Hazard Identification and Control program

The provisions of this procedure apply to the development and implementation of the Contractor?s Hazard Identification and Control program. The Contractor shall be responsible for implementing an effective Hazard Identification and Control program that:

  • Identifies, evaluates, and controls potential and existing hazards/agents in the workplace through the pre-job safety planning process.
  • Incorporates the controls into the Job Hazard Analyses
  • Determines that engineering devices, administrative controls, and personal protective equipment are available, appropriate, tested, and utilized by employees.
  • Determines employees are trained as required.
  • Has provisions to manage and notify SURF when there are changes related to the work scope, materials, and/or processes that may introduce new or different hazards to the project.
4.0 EHS Meetings and Orientations

4.1 Regulatory Requirements

Contractors will be responsible for implementing a system for conducting EHS meetings, inspections and employee EHS orientations that will facilitate compliance as applicable with the statutory requirements as listed in Chapter 2 of this Manual.

4.2 SURF Specific Requirements

In addition to Section 4.1, all Contractor EHS meetings, inspections and orientations, as applicable to the scope of the construction work activities and supporting offices/facilities shall meet the following specific SURF requirements.

4.2.1 Daily EHS Job Briefings

EHS job briefings shall be held each day prior to the start of work activities. The flexibility exists for each Contractor to integrate these requirements into their exiting EHS program format as long as the required information is effectively provided to employees and documentation for these briefings and/or meetings is maintained. This may be accomplished through daily construction meetings, plan of the day (POD) meetings (See Section 4.2.2), pre-task Job reviews or other means which prove to be effective in the dissemination of the required information and has been accepted by SURF. Records for these briefings documenting the meeting content and attendance shall be maintained. At a minimum, once a week, a safety topic shall be discussed and all crew members shall acknowledge the information disseminated, by signing the attendance roster.

The briefing content shall include at a minimum the following topics:

  • EHS pre-task planning for the day?s work activities
  • Changes in work practices or environmental conditions
  • Required equipment/system daily inspections
  • Previous days incidents, near misses, lessons learned and/or other relevant issues as applicable
  • Other ongoing activities that may have project EHS implications or may impact SURF operations
  • New or modified site-wide procedures or requirements
  • Review of JHA for new activities and/or revised existing JHA?s
  • Review of any new chemicals brought on site
  • Stop Work Authority

4.2.2 Plan of the Day Meeting

The plan of the day (POD) process is utilized during high hazard work, laboratory/construction interface and/or during complex operations where positive control and a high level of communication is required, or as directed by the contracting officer. SURF reserves the right to enforce this requirement on Contractors based upon project complexity/risk and/or Contractor EHS performance.

The basis of the POD process is in preplanning. Contractors and all lower-tier Sub-contractors shall identify all planned tasks on a POD form. The level of detail must be appropriate to define all tasks? that may present a hazard to people, property or environment. The listed task(s) shall include the corresponding previously approved JHA(s) or reference the applicable section from a current health and safety plan or program. If the task proposed does not have a corresponding JHA, then a new JHA will need to be developed and reviewed prior to the work moving forward.

The completed POD must be submitted to the 1st tier Contractor for review against conflicting operations, regulatory hold points, required permits and acceptable level of detail.

Upon approval by the 1st tier Contractor, the approved POD is then submitted to the SURF Project Manager for review and work authorization. (When required by SURF)

Once work authorization is received, each Contractor shall conduct a daily toolbox talk with each work crew member prior to the start of each work shift, or when an individual arrives at work. The meeting shall include a discussion of the specific POD and corresponding JHA or additional safety topics of interest to site personnel. Applicable, additional items, identified in Section 4.2.1 of this Manual shall also be discussed and:

All crew members shall acknowledge the daily ?tailgate? meeting by signing an attendance roster.

4.2.3 Other EHS Meetings

SURF reserves the right to require additional meetings based upon project complexity/risk and/or Contractor EHS performance. SURF may lead these meetings, or may require that Contractor supervisors, foremen or other designated personnel conduct these meetings. Meetings may be held for the entire project or smaller breakout meetings with each Contractor and/or craft. A record of each meeting, documenting the meeting content and attendance shall be maintained by the contractor.

Potential reasons for additional meetings include:

  • EHS, health, and job-related issues/concerns related to the particular operation.
  • Summary of relevant lessons learned from SURF and/or other Contractor projects as applicable
  • Accident investigations conducted and near misses, to discuss if the cause of the unsafe acts or conditions were properly identified and corrected.
  • Significant EHS inspection findings.
  • Ad hoc EHS or special emphasis training.
  • Other relevant EHS subject matter as determined by the Contractor, SURF, or the funding agencies.

4.2.4 Daily EHS Inspections and Permits

The Contractor shall ensure a supervisor, safety officer and/or competent person(s) conducts daily safety inspections of the general operations in project areas. Each worker must also be instructed to check his work area daily and on an ongoing basis to ensure that pathways/exits are clear, the work area is safe, the equipment/tools are safe and proper for the job, and any unsafe conditions or acts are reported and corrected immediately.

Contractors shall use the SDSTA 5 point safety system or equivalent. Each employee shall PAUSE at the work site and document the following:

P ? PATHWAYS: Have you checked the condition of your entrances and travelways?

  • Look up, look down, and look all around.
  • Know primary and secondary exit routes.
  • Inspect environmental conditions.

A ? AREAS: Are work areas and equipment in good working order?

  • Survey the work area for housekeeping and guarding opportunities.
  • Perform a pre-use inspection.
  • Fill out any inspection logs.
  • If no specific log is provided use the comment section to note the equipment and inspection done.

U ? UNSAFE: Describe any unsafe conditions encountered.

  • Are there any hazards that could adversely affect people, environment, property, or tasks?
  • What was done to mitigate the hazard?

S ? SAFETY: Safety is a value with rights and responsibilities.

  • Did you complete action plans, hazard analyses, or other safety procedures required to protect people and environment?
  • Have you been task-trained for your assigned job and equipment?
  • Are there Standard Operating Procedures, Job Hazard Analysis, or other work steps, or administrative control needed?

E ? EXPECTATION: An Act of Safety is something done to make the work environment better, safer, cleaner, or more efficient, than it was prior to your presence. Pause and perform an act of safety to slam risks: Stop, Look, Analyze, Manage the hazards.

The Contractor shall ensure a supervisor, safety officer, qualified person and/or competent person(s) issues and/or conducts any regulatory-required permits or documented inspections applicable to the worksite, materials and equipment. The Contractor must ensure that all SURF required permits have been issued. These inspections and/or permits include but are not limited to:

  • Aerial lifts
  • Mobile equipment
  • Building surface penetrations
  • Confined space entry
  • Cranes
  • Environmental
  • Excavations
  • Fall Protection
  • Heavy equipment
  • Hot work
  • Material handling equipment
  • Scaffold systems

The Contractor shall maintain written inspection records and/or permits and make them available for review. The Contractor shall prohibit the use of any machinery, tool, material, equipment or worksite condition that is not safe and/or does not comply with applicable requirements of these standards. Tools and equipment brought onto the site for use shall be in new or like new condition with all required safety devices in place and all regulatory markings legible.

During the inspection(s) any identified defective or unsafe equipment, tools and/or worksite locations shall be immediately corrected, tagged/barricaded, removed from the jobsite and/or other effective interim control measures taken.

4.2.5 Weekly Site EHS Inspections

4.2.5.1 Weekly Site Wide EHS Inspections

The Contractor shall conduct and document regular (at least weekly) EHS inspections of the worksites, materials, equipment, and construction operations. At a minimum, the Contractor superintendent/supervisor and the SURF Project Manager shall be part of this inspection. Coordination with the EHS POC shall be made in advance of these inspections to afford EHS the opportunity to accompany the inspections. SURF reserves the right to increase the frequency of these inspections based upon project complexity/risk and/or Contractor EHS performance.

The following factors influence the frequency of inspections:

  • Number and type of hazards involved;
  • Total level of risk to workers, property, and environment;
  • Previous experience with the Contractor;
  • Duration of the project;
  • Time elapsed since the last inspection; and
  • Changes in scope of work.

The Contractor shall maintain written inspection records and make them available for review upon request. The inspection report shall identify the hazard and the corrective actions taken or the corrective action plan with closed or anticipated completion date(s). Copies of the inspection results shall be presented at the weekly construction meeting or other SURF accepted means as applicable to the project.

During the inspection(s) any identified defective or unsafe equipment, tools and/or worksite locations shall be immediately corrected, tagged/barricaded, removed from the jobsite and/or other effective interim control measures taken.

4.2.5.2 Gang Box Inspections (Job Tool Box)

Prior to arriving on site, each subcontractor shall perform inspections of all equipment, tools and materials stored in the gang boxes. Defective tools and equipment shall be removed from the box prior to arriving on the site.

All gang boxes located on the site shall receive weekly documented inspections of equipment, tools and materials in the gang box. This inspection must be performed by the subcontractor designated competent person.

The Subcontractor shall maintain written inspection records within the gang box signed by the competent person performing the inspection.

All Tools and equipment brought onto the site for use and/or stored in the gang box shall be new or like new condition.

During the gang box inspection(s) any identified defective or unsafe equipment, tools or materials shall be immediately corrected, tagged or removed from the jobsite.

4.2.6 Contractor Employee EHS Orientation

All Contractor employees working at SURF are required to receive Construction Contractor EHS Orientation prior to the start of any work activities. The Contractor will receive a Construction Contractor Orientation by SURF at the pre-construction meeting. All Contractor employees are required to attend the SURF Construction Contractor EHS Orientation prior to the start of any work. A record of these orientations, documenting the meeting content and attendance shall be maintained by SURF.

4.3 SURF Special Emphasis

4.3.1 Weekly EHS Report

Weekly EHS reports shall be compiled and submitted as part of the project record and made available for review by SURF. The Weekly EHS report shall be submitted to the SURF EHS POC by each Tuesday for the previous week?s activities. The report shall contain the following information as applicable for the week:

  • Brief summary of significant EHS activities
    • OSHA recordable injuries
    • First Aid cases
    • Environmental releases
    • Near misses
  • Copies of daily, weekly and/or monthly EHS meeting documentation and attendee sign-in sheets
  • Copies of completed daily, weekly and/or monthly site inspections and corrective actions
  • Copies of initial or any daily inspections performed such as excavation inspections, hoisting and rigging inspections, and vehicle or equipment inspections
  • Copies of any integrated personal sampling results, including data sheets, laboratory analytical results, exposure calculation sheets, and direct reading monitoring results/reports
  • Copies of any permits used for the week including excavation permits, hot work permits, lock-out/tag-out documentation, and confined space entry permits
  • Copies of site orientation/briefing documentation and sign-in sheets for new site workers
  • Copies of any approved changes to CEHSP
  • Copies of the site first aid log if there are new entries for the week

4.3.2 Monthly EHS Reporting

Monthly EHS Reports shall be compiled and submitted to SURF EHS by the 3th of each month that include the following information:

  • Listing of man-hours, incidents and incident statistics as requested by SURF EHS.
5.0 Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

5.1 Regulatory Requirements

The selection, use, and design of PPE shall comply with the statutory requirements as listed in Chapter 2 of this Manual.

5.2 SURF Specific Requirements/Permits

In addition to Section 5.1, all Contractor PPE shall meet the following specific SURF requirements.

5.2.1 General Requirements

Personal protective equipment (PPE) is not a substitute for engineering and administrative controls. These controls shall be implemented, to the extent feasible, to mitigate the hazard so that the need for PPE is reduced or eliminated. Contractors shall provide PPE to its employees in accordance with OSHA requirements (CFR 1910.132 & CFR 1910.134).

At a minimum, all Contractor personnel shall wear sturdy hard toed work shoes, long pants, and shirts with 4 ? sleeves when performing field work. Personnel working on construction activities or in the field shall also wear hard hats, safety glasses with rigid side-shields and reflective, high visibility traffic safety vests (minimum ANSI Class 2). Exceptions to these minimum requirements shall be approved by the SURF EHS office and notated in the activity-specific JHA.

The Contractor is responsible for supplying and requiring the wearing of appropriate personal protective equipment in all operations where there is an exposure to hazardous conditions and/or where this Manual indicates the need for using such equipment to reduce the hazards to the employees.

5.2.2 Training

Contractors shall provide training to each employee who is required to use PPE. Each affected employee must show understanding of training to their specific PPE. Retraining may be necessary if work activities change or the employee exhibits lack of understanding of the PPE.

5.2.3 Specific Requirements

5.2.3.1 PPE Hazard Assessment and Selection

The appropriated PPE for the work being performed shall be specified in the applicable JHA. The PPE selection shall be based on the hazard assessment results conducted for the work activity. Examples of applicable hazard assessment documentation include:

  • Job Hazard Analysis (JHA)
  • Fall Protection Plan
  • Confined Space Entry Permit
  • Hot Work Permit
  • Energized Electrical Work Permit
  • Building Surface Penetration Permit
  • Other work control documents

The JHA shall address at a minimum the following PPE requirements as applicable to the work activity:

  • Foot protection
  • Hand Protection
  • Respiratory Protection
  • Head Protection
  • Eye and Face Protection
  • Hearing Protection
  • Body protection
  • Fall Protection

5.3 Contractor Responsibilities

The Contractor shall:

  • Perform an assessment identifying hazards or potential hazards and determine necessary PPE for activities to be performed;
  • Include PPE requirements in project JHAs, as applicable;
  • Adhere to prescribed SURF postings and/or SURF pre-job planning documentation requiring use of PPE;
  • Provide adequate PPE for all its employees;
  • Properly maintain, use and store PPE;
  • Remove damaged and/or defective equipment from service; and,
  • Provide appropriate training to PPE users.
6.0 Occupational Medicine

6.1 Regulatory Requirements

The Contractor shall establish and provide comprehensive occupational medicine services to workers on the site, as required by the statutory requirements as listed in Chapter 2 of this Manual.

6.2 SURF Specific Requirements/Permits

In addition to Section 6.1, the Contractor?s occupational medicine program shall meet SURF requirements on health and safety plans.

Where applicable, SURF requires Contractors to submit health and safety plans that document compliance with occupational medicine requirements where the nature of the work requires monitoring.

6.3 SURF Special Emphasis

Occupational medicine monitoring requirements are unfamiliar to many Contractors and ?flowing down?, or transferring the responsibility for compliance with these requirements to lower-tier Sub-contractors, may result in inadequate oversight to ensure high quality compliance. Furthermore, Contractors may fail to inform occupational medicine services providers of their responsibilities. In order to provide SURF employees and its Contractors with a safe and healthful work environment SURF requires evidence of a monitoring program where work activity JHA indicates monitoring should take place.

6.4 Contractor Responsibilities

6.4.1 Medical Monitoring Requirements

The Contractor is responsible for the accurate and timely flow down of occupational medical monitoring requirements to all of their lower-tier Sub-contractors, and, for insuring that all of their lower-tier Sub-contractors comply with these requirements.

6.4.2 Access to Worksite Hazard Information

The Contractor is responsible for providing their occupational medicine services providers access to worksite hazard information.

  • The Contractor is responsible for coordinating with the SURF project manager and providing the occupational medicine services provider with access to the following:
    • Current information about actual or potential work-related site hazards (chemical, radiological, physical, biological, or ergonomic);
    • Employee job-task and hazard analysis information, including essential job functions;
    • Actual or potential work-site exposures of each employee; and
    • Personnel actions resulting in a change of job functions, hazards, or exposures.
  • Contractors shall notify the occupational medicine services providers when an employee has been absent because of an injury or illness for more than 5 consecutive workdays (or an equivalent time period for those individuals on an alternative work schedule);

6.4.3 Medical Recordkeeping

The Contractor and occupational medicine services provider is responsible for developing and maintaining a record, containing any medical, health history, and exposure history for the occupational medicine purposes, for each employee for whom medical services are provided.

6.4.4 The Contractor is responsible for notifying the occupational medicine services provider and for implementing and ensuring compliance with the following requirements:

  • The occupational medicine services provider determines the content of the worker health evaluations
    • Workers shall be informed of the purpose and nature of the medical evaluations and tests offered by the occupational medicine services provider and
    • The occupational medical provider shall determine the necessary health evaluations.
    • Diagnostic examinations will evaluate employee?s injuries and illnesses to determine work-relatedness, the applicability of medical restrictions, and referral for definitive care, as appropriate. After a work-related injury or illness or an absence due to any injury or illness lasting 5 or more consecutive workdays (or an equivalent time period for those individuals on an alternative work schedule), a return to work evaluation will determine the individual?s physical and psychological capacity to perform work and return to duty. At the time of separation from employment, individuals shall be offered a general health evaluation to establish a record of physical condition.
  • The occupational medicine services provider shall monitor ill and injured workers to facilitate their rehabilitation and safe return to work and to minimize lost time and its associated costs.
  • The occupational medicine services provider shall include measures to identify and manage the principal preventable causes of premature morbidity and mortality affecting worker health and productivity.
    • The Contractor shall include programs to prevent and manage these causes of morbidity when evaluations demonstrate their cost effectiveness.
  • The occupational medicine services provider shall review and approve the medical and behavioral aspects of employee counseling and health promotional programs, including the following types:
    • Contractor-sponsored or Contractor supported Employee Assistance Programs (EAPs);
    • Contractor-sponsored or Contractor supported alcohol and other substance abuse rehabilitation programs; and
    • Contractor-sponsored or Contractor supported wellness programs.
7.0 Hearing Conservation

7.1 Regulatory Requirements

Contractor Hearing Conservation Program shall meet or exceed the statutory requirements as listed in Chapter 2 of this Manual.

7.2 SURF Specific Requirements

In addition to Section 7.1, the Contractor hearing conservation program shall meet the following SURF requirements as applicable.

7.2.1 Control Measures

SURF uses a hierarchy of control measures to reduce noise levels as low as feasible. The order of precedence for mitigating hazards establishes the actions to be considered in an order of effectiveness to achieve intended risk reduction. The hierarchy is as follows:

  1. Elimination or substitution of the hazards
  2. Engineering controls
  3. Work practices and administrative controls that limit worker exposures
  4. Personal protective equipment (PPE).

Every feasible effort shall be made to ?engineer out? noise exposures greater than or equal to an 8-hr time-weighted-average (TWA) sound level of 85 decibels (dBA) on the A-weighted scale prior to using personal hearing protection as a noise attenuation device. When controls are not feasible or fail to reduce noise to acceptable levels, hearing protection shall be required. Additionally, if work is to be performed in an environment that is suspected to exceed the allowable noise exposures, mandatory hearing protection requirements shall be implemented.

7.2.2 Noise Evaluation

The Contractor shall survey and evaluate suspected high noise areas and work efforts. Employees may observe surveys and evaluations, and the results shall be made available to employees. Contractors must control employee exposures when noise levels exceed 85dBA as an 8-hr TWA, or if impact/impulse noise exceeds 140dBC. Maximum allowable noise exposure shall not exceed the permissible noise exposures shown in 29 CFR 1910.95 or the ACGIH TLV?s. Noise exposure shall be determined without regard to hearing protection provided.

7.2.3 High Noise Area Posting

High noise areas shall be posted with appropriate warning signs at all entrances.

8.0 Industrial Hygiene

8.1 Regulatory Requirements

The Contractor industrial hygiene program shall be conducted in accordance with the statutory requirements as listed in Chapter 2 of this Manual.

8.2 SURF Specific Requirements/Permits

In addition to the requirements in Section 8.1, the Contractor industrial hygiene program shall meet the following SURF requirements as applicable.

8.2.1 General Requirements

Identification of Health Hazards

The Contractor shall identify existing and potential physical, chemical and biological health hazards. The task specific JHA should include any additional hazards revealed by supplemental site information provided by SURF (e.g., site characterization data, as-built drawings, information regarding adjacent operations, etc.); and should be kept updated to reflect significant changes in exposure potential, new information, monitoring data, etc.

Control Measures

The Contractor?s industrial hygiene program shall require that controls are implemented to eliminate or reduce employee exposures to below recognized occupational exposure limits (PEL?s & TLV?s). Contractors should strive to maintain exposures to As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). Control measures to eliminate or reduce industrial hygiene-related exposures shall be identified during the pre-job planning process, and delineated in the JHA.

The implementation of control measures shall follow the following hierarchy:

  1. Substitute to a less hazardous material if possible;
  2. Use engineering controls;
  3. Use administrative controls;
  4. Use PPE

Exposure Assessment

The Contractor shall perform monitoring as necessary to document employee exposures to chemical and physical hygiene hazards. Negative exposure assessments are encouraged even when not specifically required by a substance-specific standard. Exposure assessments may be performed using various methodologies (integrated sampling, direct-reading instrumentation, modeling, etc.), as appropriate for the material(s) of concern, the site conditions and the type of data needed.

8.2.2 Control of Hazardous Materials

A hazardous material is any substance that presents a physical or health hazard to humans. Hazardous material exposures should be maintained at the lowest exposure levels practical. A chemical shall not be used in any situation unless an individual has information indicating how the material can be used safely. Control measures to prevent overexposure to chemicals shall be incorporated into the JHA as necessary.

Carcinogen Control

The Contractor shall make every attempt to substitute less hazardous substances for any carcinogenic material (as defined by OSHA in 29 CFR 1910.1200). If hazardous materials containing carcinogenic components are used, the Contractor shall ensure that exposures are eliminated or effectively maintained As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA).

Where the Contractor?s use of carcinogens may impact SURF workers, SURF may impose additional, specific controls upon the Contractor.

8.2.3 Contractor Worksite Dust Control

All Contractor projects shall address dust control during pre-job planning. Outdoor areas to be cleared for construction shall be limited to keep dust generation to a minimum. Earthwork activities shall be suspended when winds exceed 30 mph. Construction of permanent roadways and parking areas should be scheduled during the early stages of a project. During construction, frequent watering shall be provided to roadways and disturbed areas that are not otherwise treated. Although visible outdoor fugitive dust emissions are limited to 20%, the Contractor may need to perform worker exposure monitoring at much lower levels to demonstrate negative exposures to silica.

During facility renovation activities barriers are to be installed as needed to prevent dust migration from construction areas to other occupied space. Sufficient equipment shall be kept at the jobsite to control dust whenever a nuisance or hazard occurs. Indoors, dry sweeping is discouraged.

8.2.4 Sanitation

Housekeeping shall be maintained on a daily basis. All work areas, shops and offices shall be kept clean to the extent the nature of the work allows. Walking/working surfaces shall be maintained, so far as practicable, in a dry condition. Waste receptacles that do not leak and may be thoroughly cleaned and maintained in a sanitary condition shall be used. All sweepings, wastes, refuse, and garbage shall be removed in a timely and sanitary manner. Cleaning and sweeping shall be done in a manner, which minimizes the contamination of the air with dust or particulate matter. Building entrances and openings shall be maintained to minimize the entry of vermin.

When provided, water facilities and containers shall be maintained, cleaned, and sanitized in accordance with applicable regulations. Use of common utensils (e.g., sharing the same cup) is prohibited. Adequate and fully-equipped toilets and wash stations shall be readily accessible to workers and maintained in a sanitary manner at all times.

8.2.5 Personal Exposure Monitoring

The Contractor shall perform monitoring as necessary to document employee exposures to chemical and physical hygiene hazards, and to meet regulatory requirements. Negative exposure assessments are encouraged even when not specifically required by a substance-specific standard. Workers shall be informed of monitoring results within the OSHA-specified timeframe. Co-located workers (who have similar exposure potential as those who were monitored) shall also be informed of the results, after removing any personal/confidential information.

The Contractor shall notify the SURF EHS point of contact of the results of monitoring as soon as they are obtained, and provide SURF with copies of the results, field notes and other associated documentation along with the weekly EHS report defined in Section 4.3.1.

8.2.6 Temperature Extremes

Provisions to prevent heat stress and cold stress shall be incorporated into the project JHA(s) when work conditions may reasonably be expected to present such hazards. The Thermal Stress section of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Values (TLV?s) shall be the governing guidelines.

8.2.7.1 Heat Stress

The Contractor shall provide for appropriate mitigating measures prior to heat stress becoming an issue. The American Conference of Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) threshold limit value (TLV) guidelines shall be followed for developing and implementing heat stress mitigation strategies. The use of heat stress controls shall be addressed during the planning stages for all work that is to be performed in elevated temperature environments, and whenever impermeable clothing or multiple layers of clothing shall be worn to conduct work.

8.2.7.2 Cold Stress

The ACGIH Cold Stress Threshold Limit Value (TLV) is the prescribed standard for cold exposure. When work involves continuous employee exposure to an equivalent chill temperature (ECT) below 10? F, the following safe work practices shall be observed:

  • Workers are instructed on symptoms of frostbite and hypothermia, and appropriate preventive and first aid measures.
  • Warming areas are conveniently available and workers shall be allowed to access the warming areas at will.
  • Work is conducted using the ?buddy system? or under continued supervision.

Non-emergency work is curtailed when the ECT in the work area is below -25? F.

Workers who experience physical illness or injury from cold exposure are to be immediately moved to a warm area, and then examined by a physician.

8.2.7 Lighting and Illumination

The minimum lighting level for construction areas both indoors and outdoors shall be an average of 5 ft candles measured 30 in. above the floor. Illumination for general construction plant and shop areas shall maintain an average lighting level of 10 ft candles. Auxiliary lighting shall be used when needed for task specific activities. Care shall be exercised with the use of halogen lamps so that fire hazards are not created.

8.2.8 Ventilation

Local exhaust ventilation is a primary engineering control and is required to reduce concentrations of hazardous, irritating, and odiferous air contaminants below allowable exposure limits (where feasible). The operability of such systems shall be evaluated prior to the start of the work. The ACGIH?s Industrial Ventilation Guide is the reference of standard for the design, testing and operation of ventilation systems. Ventilation systems requiring HEPA filtration should be leak- or DOP-tested at least annually to verify their effectiveness.

8.2.9 Silica Exposure

The Contractor is responsible for keeping worker exposures to silica at, or below, the ACGIH TLVs, or the limits as calculated in OSHA?s 1910.1000, Table Z-3, whichever is lower. In general, engineering controls such as wet methods or ventilation should be employed whenever dust-producing activities are anticipated. See also section 8.2.3, ?Contractor Worksite Dust Control.?

8.2.10 Lead Program

Prior to performing work activities involving the use or potential release of lead, the Contractor shall provide a completed Lead Work Permit to SURF EHS for approval.

8.2.11 Hexavalent Chrome

The Construction Industry Chromium (VI) Standard (29 CFR 1926.1126) will apply to all work performed by the Contractor that may expose workers to airborne hexavalent chromium. The Contractor shall be responsible for compliance with all requirements of the Standard.

8.2.12 Asbestos

No disturbance of suspect or known asbestos-containing materials shall take place unless performed by trained, certified and SURF authorized entities. If suspect asbestos-containing materials are unexpectedly encountered during the course of construction activities, the Contractor shall immediately cease work and contact the SURF Project Manager or SURF EHS POC. Asbestos-containing construction/building materials shall not be brought on-site without the express, advance and written consent of SURF.

The Contractor conducting asbestos-related work shall be responsible for compliance with the OSHA Construction Standard 29 CFR 1926.1101 and the requirements below.

The Asbestos Abatement Contractor shall:

  • Submit an Asbestos Work Plan which provides detailed information on how the work is to be performed. Type of information to be included is critical barriers, work practices, removal/disturbance methods, and signs and labels to be used; air monitoring to be performed; and waste handling procedures (packaging, disposal site). This plan shall be submitted to EHS for review and concurrence prior to starting work. Work shall comply with the requirements set forth in 29 CFR 1926.1101
  • Work shall be performed in a Regulated Area.
  • Maintain copies of Asbestos Worker Certification at the site for inspection by EHS.
  • Provide copy of Asbestos Supervisor Certification to EHS.
  • Provide copy of General Abatement Contractor Certification to EHS.
  • Provide copy of workers respiratory protection certification to EHS.
  • Provide proof of insurance covering asbestos abatement activities that extends the length of the project to EHS.
  • Provide copies of all air monitoring results to EHS once received.
  • Request EHS to review and sign Waste Disposal Manifest prior to removing waste from site and provide copy of manifest to EHS. Asbestos waste may not be combined with waste from other projects. It shall be shipped directly to a landfill and may not be stored in an intermediate satellite storage location.
  • Prepare an Job Hazard Analysis (JHA) for the asbestos abatement activity and submit to the SURF Project Manager and EHS POC for review and concurrence.

8.2.13 Lasers

Class 1 laser systems incorporated into commercially available devices for use by the general public are exempt from these requirements, unless opened, serviced or modified. Laser equipment shall bear a conspicuously displayed label to indicate hazard classification.

Users of Class 1, Class 1M, Class 2, Class 2M, Class 3a, or Class 3R lasers shall read and abide by the safety documentation provided in the operator?s Guide. Only qualified and trained personnel may service, adjust, or repair laser equipment. Employees, when working in areas in which a potentially hazardous exposure to direct or reflected laser radiation exists, shall be provided with anti-laser protection devices.

Class 3B and Class 4 Laser Use

Class 3B and 4 laser equipment shall not be used without the express written permission of the SURF Laser Safety Officer.

8.2.14 Safety Showers and Eyewashes

Suitable facilities for quick drenching or flushing of the eyes and body (eyewash/shower apparatus) shall be provided within the work area for immediate emergency use where the eyes or body of any person may be exposed to injurious corrosive materials, (e.g., corrosives, skin sensitizes, etc.). An eyewash/shower apparatus shall be located such that it would require no more than 10 seconds to reach from the hazard. Access shall be free of any impediments. For battery handling areas, facilities for quick drenching of the eyes and body shall be provided within 25 feet.

Employees who may have a need for an eyewash/shower apparatus shall know where the nearest eyewash/shower apparatus is located and how to operate it. Monthly functional testing of eyewash/shower apparatus shall be documented. The potable water provided for a portable eyewash/shower apparatus shall be flushed or changed according to manufacturer?s specifications.

8.2.15 Ionizing Radiation

Radioactive materials, sealed radioactive sources, or devices that generate ionizing radiation shall not be brought on the SURF site without express written permission of the SURF Radiation Safety Officer. Any Contractor needing to bring radioactive material, sources or radiation-generating devices onto SURF property shall allow sufficient lead time in their schedule for SURF review of their program, documentation, training records, other submittals, etc.

8.2.16 Blood-borne Pathogens

Employees who may reasonably be expected to be exposed to blood or other body fluids shall comply with OSHA/ requirements relating to this subject. First aid kits shall contain ?Universal Precautions? items, including chemical splash goggles, medical gloves, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) masks (with one-way valve), antiseptic hand cleaner, drying cloths, and red bags labeled ?BIOHAZARD.? Medical waste generated as a result of first aid response shall be placed in labeled red bags, and disposed of appropriately.

8.2.17 Other Health Hazards

Other hazards that may be present during the course of the Contractor?s work which is not specifically addressed in this Manual shall be identified by the Contractor and addressed in their JHA(s). Contractors are encouraged to discuss their potential hazards in advance with SURF EHS and/or the SURF Project Manager to help ensure minimal impact to the project schedule and the smooth coordination of logistics.

8.3 SURF Special Emphasis

Some chemicals are considered by SURF to be extremely hazardous and have additional requirements for bringing on SURF property and/or specific worker exposure monitoring requirements (see Section 11.3 for a listing of extremely hazardous chemicals).

8.4 Contractor Responsibilities

8.4.1 Contractors Industrial Hygiene Program

The provisions of this procedure apply to the development and implementation of the Contractor?s Industrial Hygiene Program. The Contractor shall be responsible for implementing an effective IH program that:

  • Identifies, evaluates, and controls potential and existing hazards/agents in the workplace through the pre-job safety planning process.
  • Determines that engineering devices, administrative controls, and personal protective equipment are available, appropriate, tested, and utilized by employees.
  • Determines employees are trained as required.
  • Stops work that is not being safely performed.
  • Reports occupational exposure data to affected employees in a timely manner.
9.0 Fire Protection and Prevention

9.1 Regulatory Requirements

The Contractor fire protection & prevention program shall be conducted in accordance with the statutory requirements as listed in Chapter 2 of this Manual.

9.2 SURF Specific Requirements/Permits

In addition to Section 9.1 of this Manual, the Contractor fire protection and prevention program shall meet the following SURF Laboratory Procedure requirements as applicable.

9.2.1 Working with Open Flame, Welding, Cutting, or Grinding

The following requirements apply to Contractors conducting activities with open flames, welding, cutting, or grinding and other flame/spark producing tasks (hereafter referred to as ?Hot Work?).

  • The Contractor shall perform hot work in accordance with a Hot Work Permit as outlined in Section 9.2.2 of this Manual.
  • The Contractor shall ensure that all lower-tier Sub-contractors understand and comply with the requirements of the permit system.
  • Contractor personnel who perform fire watch duties shall be qualified. Individual(s) performing fire watch duties shall be proficient in the use of fire extinguishers.
  • Alternatives to performing hot work (e.g., saw cutting instead of grinding wheel or torch cutting; crimp-type pipe fittings instead of soldered fittings) should be used where practical.
  • Hot work should be performed in Contractor shops or designated areas (e.g., pre-approved weld booths or shop areas) where practical.
  • Completed hot work permits shall be returned to the Project Manager/Building Manager and/or Construction Contractor Safety Officer as applicable when the work is complete.

9.2.2 Hot Work Permit System

Contractors conducting hot work will perform the hot work under a SURF Hot Work Permit. The SURF Project Manager/BM or a SURF authorized ?Permit Authorizing Individual?(PAI) will issue the permit. The Contractor will be responsible for providing all the required materials, personnel and protective equipment to conduct all hot work.

Prior to the start of any hot work activity, the Contractor shall perform a walk-down of the work to facilitate thorough hazard identification and control. The Contractor is ultimately responsible for compliance with the requirements of the permit. The Hot Work Permit is valid for the specified task noted on the permit for the date issued. Variance from the scope of work identified on the permit is prohibited.

The SURF Hot Work Permit System and the associated Hot Work Permit Checklist can be obtained from the SURF EHS Office.

9.2.2.1 Hot Work Location Selection Hierarchy

The location of hot work shall be determined by utilizing the following priority list:

  • If work must be conducted onsite, combustibles shall not be located within 35 feet of the work area.
  • If work must be conducted onsite and combustibles cannot be removed from within 35 feet of the work area, fire barriers such as screens or blankets shall be used to protect combustibles.
  • Protect openings in walls, floors, roofs, and ceilings where sparks can travel beyond the work area to inaccessible or unprotected areas. Openings or cracks in walls, floors, roofs or ceilings within 35 ft of the site shall be tightly covered with fire-retardant or noncombustible material to prevent the passage of sparks to adjacent areas.
  • Beware of heat conduction through penetrations. Hot work that is performed on pipes or other metal that is in contact with combustible walls, partitions, ceilings, roofs, or other combustibles, shall not be undertaken if the work is close enough to cause ignition by conduction.

9.2.2.2 Fire Watch

The Contractor shall establish a fire watch to protect the safety of workers and assets. The fire watch observes staff conducting the welding, cutting, or grinding operations and monitors adjacent areas. The worker assigned to this task of fire watch shall have fire extinguishing equipment immediately available.

The fire watch shall observe the hot work area for 30 minutes (60 minutes for roof work) after the completion of hot work. For overhead work, a fire watch may be necessary on multiple levels. The fire watch may not be assigned any other duties during hot work operations. The fire watch shall stop work if sparks travel beyond the area that fire watch can observe. Individuals assigned to fire watch duties shall:

  • Be a qualified and understand the requirements of the hot work permit system
  • Be knowledgeable about fire and emergency reporting procedures and fire alarm pull box locations in buildings, if applicable.
  • Have emergency communications, such as cellular phones or radios, available when working in remote or outside areas.
  • Be trained in the use of fire extinguishing equipment

Prior to leaving the site, the fire watcher shall verify that the possibility of fire does not exist.

9.2.2.3 Fire Protection Equipment

Fire protection equipment shall be sufficient for the hazards present. At a minimum, a 4A:60BC rated fire extinguisher is required. The fire extinguisher shall be readily available in the immediate work area. Free access shall be maintained at all times to all exits, fire alarm boxes, fire extinguishing equipment, and any other emergency equipment. Free access means clear of all obstructions.

9.2.2.4 Hot Work Protective Clothing

Contractors shall ensure that the personnel protective clothing selected for hot work minimizes the potential for ignition, burning, trapping hot sparks and electric shock as identified in ANSI Z49.1, ?Safety in Welding, Cutting and Allied Processes,? sections 4.3 and E4.3, current revision.

9.2.2.5 Hot Work Required Inspections.

In addition to the fire watch requirements, the Contractor?s authorized worker/permit holder shall inspect the work area a minimum of once per day to verify compliance with permit requirements. Additionally, responsible Contractor personnel shall also perform periodic inspections to ensure continued compliance with the requirements of the permit. When inspections identify unsafe conditions or the scope of work departs from that defined in the permit, the hot work shall be stopped immediately.

9.2.2.6 Hot Work Outdoors

The Contractor shall ensure that vegetation and other combustibles are removed, cut back, or otherwise protected to prevent ignition during hot work outdoors. A high level of caution shall be exercised to prevent wildland fires. If wind speeds exceed a constant velocity of 10 miles per hour, hot work is not permitted outdoors.

9.2.3 Fire Protection System Outages and Impairments

Contractors performing work shall plan their work and take the necessary steps to minimize outages or impairments of fire suppression, detection, or alarm systems. When outages are necessary to perform a particular scope of work, they shall be coordinated and approved by the SURF Project Manager and the EHS Office. A SURF Fire Protection System Outage Permit shall be issued by the SURF Project Manager/Building Manager. Compensatory measures necessary to achieve a commensurate level of fire protection shall be incorporated into the permit.

9.2.4 Exits and Exit Access

The Contractor shall ensure that a clear path of at least 44 inches is maintained to exits on indoor projects. Exits shall be marked by a readily visible sign. Access to exits shall be marked by readily visible signs in all cases where the exit or way to reach it is not immediately visible to the occupants.

9.2.5 Flammable and Combustible Liquids Storage

Flammable and combustible liquids shall be stored in approved containers and cabinets, such as those that are UL or FM listed, and quantities shall be limited to minimize fuel loading in accordance with NFPA Codes. Rags used to apply flammable liquids are to be disposed of in a self-closing approved safety containers designed for that use.

9.2.6 Smoking

Smoking on SURF property is prohibited.

9.2.7 Housekeeping/Trash

The Contractor shall police the work area frequently and maintain good housekeeping. Common garbage and other waste shall be disposed of at frequent and regular intervals. Containers shall be provided for the collection and separation of waste, trash, oily or used rags, and other refuse. Containers used for garbage and other oily, flammable, or hazardous wastes, (such as caustics, acids, harmful dusts or similar materials) shall be equipped with covers. Chemical agents or substances, which might react to create a hazardous condition, shall be stored and disposed of separately.

10.0 Environmental Requirements

10.1 Regulatory Requirements

Environmental protection is addressed through the statutory requirements as listed in Chapter 2 of this Manual.

10.2 SURF Specific Requirements/Permits

In addition to Section 10.1, all work activities shall meet the following SURF requirements, as applicable.

10.2.1 National Environmental Policy Act Requirements (NEPA)

A provisional NEPA review may have been initially completed so that the project design could be completed. Once the details of the project have been described in the Preliminary Design, but before initiation of construction activities, additional environmental review may be required. Depending on the nature and scope of the activity, the environmental review process could take a few days to several weeks.

10.2.2 Storm Water Discharge Requirements

Storm water discharges associated with construction sites that disturb greater than one acre are regulated by the State via the Construction Storm water Permit. Contractors performing construction activities on these sites are responsible for obtaining coverage under the State?s Permit. This requires filing a Notice of Intent with the State and preparation of site specific Storm water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP). Contractors are required to utilize a template provided to them by SURF EHS Office for preparation of the SWPPP. The SURF EHS Office shall review and accept the Contractor SWPPP in advance of applying for EPA coverage and before beginning construction activities.

Construction activities that disturb less than one acre do not require coverage under the State Permit. However, the Contractor shall prepare a site specific erosion control plan that shall be accepted by SURF EHS before construction activities can begin. SWPPP shall include a spill prevention, response and cleanup plan for managing chemicals and petroleum products.

10.2.3 Air Emissions Requirements

10.2.3.1 Fugitive Dust

The Contractor shall establish a Particulate Emissions Control Plan where required for its Construction Activities.

10.2.3.2 Point Source Emissions (from pipes, vents, and stacks)

The Contractor is responsible for listing all equipment that is capable of exhausting a gas or particulate into the air. The list shall be submitted to the SURF EHS POC and Project Manager along with a list of all chemicals to be used in the execution of work prior to the start of work for review and approval. SURF requires that tier III or tier IV stationary engines be used for all work. Lower rated engines may be used with prior approval by SURF EHS and with a filter/scrubber. Construction vehicles, equipment, and Contractor?s personal vehicles shall be operated to minimize emissions. Unnecessary idling of vehicles and equipment is prohibited. Idling of vehicles for occupant heating/cooling comfort is prohibited.

10.2.4 Pipe Flushing

Pipeline flushing of new water lines, storm and sanitary sewer lines, or fire line flushing requires preparation and approval by SURF EHS of a plan that describes the location and nature of activity to be performed, description of the discharge (duration, anticipated volume and rate, source of the water, potential pollutants in the water used), and the BMPs to be used to prevent potential pollutants from reaching the storm drainage system, a stream, drainage channel, ditch or groundwater.

Coordination with SURF EHS is required for all pipe flushing activities that have the potential to reach the storm drain system, a stream drainage channel, ditch or groundwater.

10.2.5 Trash, Construction Debris and Sanitary Waste

The Contractor shall provide waste storage and removal as required to maintain the construction site in a clean and orderly condition with periodic disposal of waste off-site. Open free-fall chutes and containers without lids are prohibited. Trash and debris is prohibited from migrating outside the construction area. All trash and debris is to be collected daily.

10.2.6 Wastewater

SURF limits wastewater discharges to sewer or septic systems. SURF does not permit other direct wastewater discharges to the environment, including land, surface water or to the underground. Contact SURF EHS if such a discharge is planned for possible permitting requirements.

10.2.7 Hazardous Waste

SURF holds the necessary Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) generator identification numbers to conduct waste generation and collection activities. SURF prohibits treating (evaporation, neutralization, dilution, or reduction of volume or toxicity) or disposing of hazardous waste on site. The Contractor shall contact SURF EHS prior to any construction activity that will generate hazardous or chemical waste. Special handling, storage, and labeling requirements may apply depending upon the type and quantity of chemical waste.

10.2.8 Asbestos

The use of Asbestos Containing Material (ACM) is not authorized. However it is possible that unidentified ACM may be discovered during excavation activities. The Project Manager shall review the asbestos map with the contractor prior to work commencing. Should ACM be discovered, the Contractor shall stop the affected work and notify the SURF Project Manager.

10.2.9 Noise

Per State Noise Statute, construction projects are limited to permit conditions or 80 dBA for the period within which the construction is to be completed or a reasonable amount of time.

10.2.10 Pesticide and Herbicide Use

All pesticide and herbicide use shall be approved by the SURF Environmental Manager prior to application.

10.2.11 Vegetation

Project design shall attempt to minimize the elimination of existing trees/shrubs, which provide local wildlife habitat, reduce cooling needs in summer by providing shade, and remove carbon dioxide from the air, thus contributing to a reduction of greenhouse gases generated at SURF. The contractor shall revegetate surface areas with contractor seed mix upon completion of work unless specified otherwise in the contract.

10.3 Contractor Responsibilities

The provisions of this procedure apply to Contractors performing activities which have the potential to affect natural resources that include storm water, wetlands, streams, air quality, vegetation and wildlife. The Contractor and all lower-tier Sub-contractors shall be responsible for implementation and compliance with all federal, state and local laws as well as SURF procedures as described above and referenced below.

11.0 Hazard Communication

11.1 Regulatory Requirements

The Contractor?s Hazard Communication program shall be conducted in accordance with the statutory requirements as listed in Chapter 2 of this Manual.

Required components of a Hazard Communication Program include hazard determination, Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS), labels and other forms of warning, employee information training, and a written Hazard Communication Program defining the above.

11.2 SURF Specific Requirements/Permits

In addition to the requirements in Section 11.1, the Contractor?s Hazard Communication program shall meet the following SURF requirements as applicable.

11.2.1 General Requirements

When selected for contract award, submit for approval, prior to beginning work, a list of all hazardous materials to be used on the project to the SURF Project Manager with copies to the SURF EHS POC. All materials must be approved prior to being brought on site.

The Contractor is responsible for maintaining an up-to-date chemical inventory and copies of Material Safety Data Sheets (only of those chemicals brought on site). These shall be maintained at the task or project support facilities and made readily available for review by site workers, or SURF employees. The list (inventory) may include a book of MSDSs, appropriately labeled and periodically updated to reflect the workplace inventory.

Prior to using any newly introduce hazardous material or product, supervisors shall obtain a copy of the appropriate MSDS and review it with their employees and any affected SURF employees. Project Job Hazard Analyses should be updated to reflect health and safety controls specific to chemical use.

Each original container of hazardous materials shall have the manufacturer?s label affixed to it or be labeled, marked, or tagged showing the identity of the hazardous chemicals, the appropriate hazard warning, and the name and address of the chemical manufacturer, importer, or other responsible party.

Secondary and subsequent containers of hazardous chemicals shall be labeled, marked, or tagged prior to use with the identity of the hazardous materials and the appropriate hazard warnings. The only exception to this is for portable containers into which hazardous chemicals are transferred, which need no label if all of the following conditions are met:

  • The contents of the portable container are for the immediate use of only the person making the transfer, and the container remains under their direct control; AND,
  • The unlabeled portable container is used only within the work shift during which it was originally filled.

11.2.2 Specific Communication Requirements

If the Contractor uses a labeling system that is an unusual format, or not readily understandable, the Contractor shall inform other affected workers of how to read/understand their labeling system.

The Contractor shall determine if their use of hazardous materials may affect (expose, or pose a potential danger in the event of an emergency) other Contractor or SURF employees. If the hazardous materials form or the way it will be used creates a potential for affecting other employees, the Contractor shall take appropriate notification steps. The Contractor shall inform the other employer(s) of any precautionary measures that need to be taken to protect other Contractor and/or SURF employees from inadvertent/unnecessary exposure to the Contractor?s hazardous materials during normal operating conditions and in foreseeable emergencies.

Work areas where chemical and/or biological hazards are known to pose an exposure potential shall be clearly designated as such (with signs, placards, postings, etc.) along with control requirements (PPE requirements, ventilation, authorization for access required, etc.).

11.3 SURF Special Emphasis

Some chemicals are considered by SURF to be extremely hazardous and have additional requirements for bringing on SURF property. Extremely hazardous materials at SURF include the following classes of chemicals:

  • Alkali metals
  • Beryllium
  • Perchloric Acid and other peroxide-forming chemicals
  • Unstable, reactive, pyrophoric or explosive chemicals
  • Hydrofluoric acid
  • Radioactive materials
  • Highly toxic chemicals and reproductive toxins (depending upon the form, the quantity and method of application or use)
  • Pesticides/Herbicides
  • Bio-chemicals

Use of these chemicals at SURF may necessitate additional control mechanisms such as establishing dedicated use areas, specific postings/warning signs, notification to adjacent workers, ventilation controls, decontamination procedures, personal hygiene facilities, etc. It is the Contractor?s responsibility to notify the SURF EHS point of contact prior to bringing the material on site (preferably during the project planning stages) if intending to use extremely hazardous materials on their project, in order to ensure that the proper controls are built in.

11.4 Contractor Responsibilities

The Contractor shall be responsible for:

  • Administering their Hazard Communication Program.
  • Maintaining an on-site list of hazardous materials and MSDSs to be used on the project.
  • Determining the hazards of materials used in the workplace, making MSDSs available to employees, labeling containers, and providing information and training to employees on hazardous materials.
  • Developing work practice requirements for hazardous materials identified in the JHA.
  • Bringing on-site only those chemicals needed to perform the work for which they are contracted, and only in quantities needed for the job at-hand.
  • Identifying when the Contractor?s use of hazardous materials may affect (expose, or pose a potential danger in the event of an emergency) other Contractor?s, or SURF, employees and taking appropriate notification steps.
  • Storing chemicals in accordance with the manufacturer?s instructions, applicable regulations and best management practices.
  • Remove chemicals from the work area and properly dispose of them when no longer needed.
  • Comply with exposure monitoring and medical surveillance requirements associated with chemical use.
12.0 Control of Hazardous Energy, Lock-out/Tag-out

12.1 Regulatory Requirements

The Contractor control of hazardous energy program shall be conducted in accordance with the statutory requirements as listed in Chapter 2 of this Manual.

Exception: Contractors are not required to adhere to requirements for ?Periodic Inspections? contained in 29 CFR 1910.147(c)(6).

12.2 SURF Specific Requirements/Permits

In addition to Section 12.1, all work activities requiring the use of lock-out/tag-out shall meet the following SURF requirements as applicable in sections 12.2.1 ? 12.2.5 of this Manual.

12.2.1 Energized Electrical Work

Work on energized systems at SURF must be avoided unless it is been determined by the SURF Electrical Safety Engineer that there is no reasonable alternative course of action. If energized electrical work must be performed on hazardous circuits, the Contractor shall obtain an Energized Electrical Work Permit (EEWP) from the SURF Electrical Safety Engineer prior to performing any energized electrical work. If energized work must be performed on any other type of energy system, it shall be authorized by the SURF Project Manager and EHS POC.

Exception: Taking voltage, current measurements and verification of zero energy using standard test equipment such as voltmeters and current probes is permitted on energized electrical systems without an issuance of an EEWP. All other hazard identification, control and PPE requirements continue to apply and shall be documented in the JHA.

12.2.2 SURF Building Equipment and Systems Lock-out/Tag-out

Prior to conducting any work which requires lock-out/tag-out within an existing SURF building or that interfaces with an existing SURF utility system, the Contractor shall first notify the SURF Project Manager. This includes lock-out/tag-outs that occur on building construction temporary and/or permanent electrical power tie-ins at the point of SURF supplied power distribution. The SURF Project Manager shall control, coordinate and approve lock-out/tag-out work being conducted on these equipment/ systems and shall ensure that the Contractors are aware of and comply with the requirements of the SURF lock-out/tag-out program. The Contractor shall ensure that the SURF Project Manager is provided with the provisions of the Contractor(s) lock-out/tag-out program/procedures. When SURF equipment/system specific procedures are available, they shall be provided to the Contractor and utilized as part of the lock-out/tag-out program.

When the Contractor performs work downstream of the SURF power distribution point for temporary or permanent power tie-in, is downstream of an existing SURF lock-out/tag-out or is completely independent of existing SURF building equipment/systems, the lock-out/tag-out shall be performed in accordance with the Contractor?s accepted lock-out/tag-out program.

12.2.2.1 Tag-out Only Requirements

When equipment/system cannot physically be locked out and a Tag-out is applied to equipment/system in place of lock-out, the Contractor shall attempt all feasible measures to renovate or modify the equipment to accept a lock-out device if the energy-isolating device(s). When this cannot be accomplished, the Contractor shall:

  • Implement additional measures to provide the equivalent level of safety. (i.e., remove isolating circuit element, valve handle) and document in the JHA.
  • Apply a properly completed tag at the energy-isolating device and at the control panel.
  • Verify that energy sources are eliminated.
  • Check the tag frequently when working under a Tag-out to verify that it is still in place.

12.2.3 Equipment Specific Lock-out/Tag-out Procedures

When written lock-out/tag-out procedures are required, the Contractor may elect to utilize their own procedure format or the SURF lock-out/tag-out equipment specific procedure format. A copy of this format can be obtained by contacting the SURF Project Manager or the EHS Office. If the Contractor elects to use their own procedure format then procedures that meet the minimum content requirements of 29 CFR 1910.147 will be deemed as acceptable by SURF.

12.2.4 Contractor Lock-out/Tag-out Inspection Procedures

The Contractor shall ensure that weekly documented inspections are made for all active lock-out/tag-out applications. These inspections shall be kept at the jobsite and made available for review by SURF.

The Contractor shall also perform daily informal (undocumented) inspections to verify lock-out/tag-out s remain in place.

12.2.5 Contractor Training Requirements

Contractors that are trained in accordance with the requirements identified in 29 CFR 1910.147, Control of Hazardous Energy (Lock-out/tag-out) will be considered as meeting the necessary training requirements for working at SURF. The Contractor shall provide proof of such training as requested by the EHS POC. The Contractor is required to provide qualified and competent persons at the job site.

12.3 SURF Special Emphasis

12.3.1 Applying Lock-out/Tag-out

Each exposed Contractor worker shall apply their lock and a properly completed tag to secure the energy source(s) prior to beginning work activities. When more than one individual is working on the same piece of equipment or project, a group lock box or multi-lock hasps (gang hasp) or other acceptable means shall be used and each worker shall apply his or her lock. Workers shall not rely on another person?s lock-out for protection. Supervisory controlled lock-out/tag-outs must be approved by the SURF project manager and SURF EHS.

13.0 Electrical Safety

13.1 Regulatory Requirements

The Contractor electrical safety program shall be conducted in accordance with the statutory requirements as listed in Chapter 2 of this Manual.

13.2 SURF Specific Requirements/Permits

In addition to Section 13.1, the Contractor electrical safety program shall meet the following SURF requirements as applicable.

13.2.1 General Electrical Work Safety Requirements

Contractors shall identify the electrical hazards associated within each definable feature of work and establish the controls necessary to maintain an acceptable level of risk. To assist in the evaluation of electrical hazards, Contractors shall employ an Electrical Hazard Analysis consistent with requirements of NFPA 70E, Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace (Current Revision as adopted by SURF) for shock and arc flash hazards. The identified hazards and control measures shall be documented in the associated Job Hazard Analysis (JHA) or other work control document that provides an acceptable level of hazard identification and control for the associated task or work sequence. See Chapter 3.0, Construction Hazard Identification and Work Control Process for additional information on the JHA process.

The safe electrical work practices that are employed shall prevent electric shock, burns, arc flash or other injuries that could result from either direct or indirect electrical contact. This may include specialized training, observing required approach distances, and the use of appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) consistent with the requirements of NFPA 70E.

13.2.1.1 Personal Protective Equipment

Contractors are responsible for identifying, providing and maintaining their own PPE. Maintenance of PPE includes the required testing and certification. Records of such testing shall be made available for review.

PPE appropriate to the hazard present shall be used. Electrical PPE may include:

  • Insulated gloves
  • Eye and face protection
  • Non-conductive headgear
  • Arc-Flash protective clothing as required by NFPA 70E
  • Hotsticks and similar tools.

13.2.1.2 Qualified Electrical Worker

Only qualified workers who maintain the necessary skills and knowledge related to the construction, operations of electrical equipment and the associated hazards are permitted to work on electrical systems at SURF. A ?Qualified Electrical Worker? is a person who has skills and knowledge related to the construction and operation of the electrical equipment and installations and has received safety training on the hazards involved. Such a person is familiar with the proper use of precautionary techniques, personal protective equipment, insulating and shielding materials, insulated tools, and test equipment in addition SURF specific procedural requirements. Verification of training shall be in accordance with Section 2.3.2.

Apprentice electricians shall work under the supervision of a Journeymen Electrician and shall have received the appropriate electrical safety training prior to assigning work assignments that involve electrical hazards. It is the responsibility of the Journeymen Electrician to assign work that is appropriate for the apprentice's experience, skill level, and training.

SURF does not allow apprentice electricians to perform work on energized electrical conductors or circuit parts that are not placed in an electrically safe work condition.

The Contractor shall be responsible for documenting the qualifications of the ?Qualified Electrical Workers? utilized on the project.

13.2.1.3 Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) Protection

Contractors shall ensure that GFCIs are used on 120-volt circuits as specified below:

  • in damp or wet (standing water) work areas
  • for temporary power (e.g., extension cords) during construction, remodeling, maintenance, repair or similar activities -outdoor receptacles shall be enclosed with weatherproof (preferably metal) covers
  • When using portable, electric hand tools and equipment with cord/plug connectors.

The users of the GFCIs shall test portable GFCIs using the test button provided before each use. If the GFCI breaker fails the test, tag out of service with a ?DANGER ? DO NOT USE? tag and (if portable) remove from service. Tripped circuit breakers may not be re-energized until it has been determined that the equipment and circuit can be safely re-energized. Do not reset or operate facility circuit breakers. Contact the Building Manager (BM) or SURF Project Manager.

13.2.1.4 Flexible Cords and Cables

Use UL-listed flexible cords suitable for conditions of and location of use. Flexible cord sets used with grounding-type equipment shall contain an equipment grounding conductor. Protect flexible cords and cables from damage. When possible, hang extension cord sets appropriately overhead to avoid tripping hazards and damage caused by foot traffic and equipment. Avoid sharp edges, pinching, or improper storage. Cords sets that are damaged shall be removed and discarded or repaired by a qualified person.

13.2.2 Lock-out/Tag-out

Contractors shall ensure that electrical systems and equipment are effectively isolated, locked, and tagged out in accordance with the requirements of Chapter 12.0, Control of Hazardous Energy, Lock-out/Tag-out of this Manual prior to performing any work on or near the energized systems. Contractors shall make all feasible efforts to effectively isolated and lock and tag out energized electrical systems and equipment in order to avoid performing Hazardous Energized Electrical Work as defined in Section 13.2.3 of this Manual.

13.2.3 Hazardous Energized Electrical Work

Hazardous Energized Electrical Work at SURF is defined as ?work performed on or close to exposed parts of electrical systems and equipment operating at greater than 50 volts to ground, or less than 50 volts to ground where the current exceeds 5mA, creating the potential for injury, explosion or injuries due to electric arcs.?

When it has been determined by the Contractor in conjunction with the appropriate SURF authorities (SURF Project Manager, Site Operations Electrical Engineer and the EHS Office) that there is no other reasonable alternative course of action, the Contractor shall obtain a SURF Authorized Energized Electrical Work Permit (EEWP) in accordance with Section 13.2.3.1 from the project manager prior to performing any hazardous energized electrical work.

Controls may still be required for energized work on ?non-hazardous circuits? to protect against secondary hazards such as startle or involuntary reactions from contact with low voltage high current sources. These would include circuits operating at 50 volts and less with a short circuit current of greater than 5mA or energy greater than 0.25 joules.

Exception: Taking voltage, current measurements and verification of zero energy using standard test equipment such as voltmeters and current probes is permitted on energized electrical systems without an ESWP. No other tools can be utilized on or near the energized parts. All other hazard identification, control and PPE requirements continue to apply.

13.2.3.1 Energized Electrical Work Permit (EEWP)

The Contractor shall ensure that a permit has been completed with the SURF required concurrences and approvals before work may be initiated on hazardous energized systems, or operation and maintenance/verification of electrical systems operating at greater than 50 volts. The permit being submitted shall be task specific. Blanket, general, or open-ended permits are prohibited and will not be processed. After a permit has been approved, subsequent changes in the scope of work or associated hazards requires cessation of work and a timely reassessment of this permit. If necessary, additional controls will be established and a new permit issued.

A SURF approved EEWP serves as the authorization basis to conduct energized electrical work on energized circuits.

13.2.4 Two Worker Rule

Contractors shall ensure that a second worker is present when hazardous energized electrical work is performed. The second worker functions as a safety observer and does not participate in the actual work. This worker shall be trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and be prepared to initiate other emergency response procedures.

14.0 Excavations

14.1 Regulatory Requirements

All Contractor excavation activities shall be conducted in accordance with the statutory requirements as listed in Chapter 2 of this Manual.

14.2 SURF Specific Requirements/Permits

14.2.1 SURF Excavation Permit

In addition to Section 14.1, Contractors shall obtain an approved SURF Excavation Permit from the appropriate SURF Building Manager (BM) or authorized Project Manager for all excavations including trenching, grading, drilling or cutting activities. A copy of this permit system can be obtained from the SURF Project Manager or BM. The BM shall determine what sections of the Excavation Permit need to be satisfactorily completed in order to authorize excavation. At a minimum, the BM and/or the SURF Project Manager and the Contractor shall physically walk the proposed excavation site with a site drawing and compare to the site utility locate drawing and physical markings. Any deviations identified during this walk shall be resolved prior to issuing the permit.

14.2.1.1 Contractor Excavation Plan

The Contractor is responsible for submitting to the SURF BM or authorized Project Manager and EHS an ?Excavation Plan? to SURF for review and concurrence before any excavation activity begins. This plan shall show the proposed boundaries on a site map including depth of the affected areas and the safety precautions, which shall comply with OSHA Standard 1926, Subpart P, Excavations.

The BM/PM will verify that the Excavation Plan with the appropriate Engineering and Construction "As-Built" utility drawings to identify any potential conflicts with existing underground facilities and/or utility lines, including information provided by the SURF Information Telecommunications (IT) Group.

14.2.1.2 Utility Locates

The SURF Project Manager will dictate the necessary underground location and identification services as part of the Contractor's work. In this case, the location service requirements shall be identified in the Contractor's excavation plan (section 14.2.1.1) and shall be performed prior to SURF authorizing the excavation permit. The BM will verify that the Contractor has located and identified all underground services with appropriate color coded markers.

The SURF Operations Group can provide drawings with approximate location of existing utilities and structures to aid in marking the utilities.

If there is any uncertainty as to the degree of safety protection anticipated on underground electrical power lines, the electrical service should be de-energized first with a planned outage arranged and coordinated through the affected BM and Project Manager.

14.2.1.3 Pot Hole Verification

The SURF Project Manager or assigned representative shall work directly with the Contractor who will hand dig or otherwise safely "pot hole" (daylight) to verify location and depth of the various utilities and SURF -owned underground facilities and/or lines which may conflict with the excavation activity.

When the Contractor excavating activities are within 5 feet of underground services, the SURF Project Manager or designated representative will be physically present for onsite monitoring to ensure compliance with the SURF accepted plan.

Note: At the BM?s discretion, the Contractor may perform pothole activities prior to the approval of the Excavation Permit. However, no other excavation may take place without the approved SURF excavation permit.

14.2.1.4 Confined Spaces

When the configuration of an excavation is such that the excavation is deemed to be a confined space, the provisions of the Chapter 15, Confined Space program shall apply.

14.2.1.5 Daily Inspections

The Designated Supervisor shall conduct daily inspections of excavations, adjacent areas, and protective systems for evidence of a situation that could result in a hazardous condition. Inspections shall be conducted prior to the start of work, and after every rainstorm in accordance with 29 CFR 1926.651(k) and a Daily Trenching Log (EHS-2000-L4-02) completed.

14.2.2 SURF Excavation Lock-out/Tag-out

The SURF Project Manager or designated representative will be physically present for onsite monitoring when excavating activities are within 5 feet of underground services to ensure compliance with the approved plan. All underground electrical (120 volts and above) and other systems covered by the lock-out/tag-out program shall be de-energized and locked out during excavations within 5 feet of those systems unless otherwise approved in advance by the appropriate BM and EHS POC.

The lock-out/tag-out shall be in accordance with SURF Lock-out Tag-out & Verification (EHS-7001-L1-01) or a SURF accepted Lock-out/tag-out Procedure.

During excavation/construction activities, no locks or tags shall be installed or removed on facility systems by Contractors without the written approval of the applicable Building Area Manager (BM) or designated representative.

14.2.3 Contractor Training Requirements

Contractor excavation Competent Person(s) that are trained and knowledgeable about soils analysis, the use of protective systems, identification of existing and predicable excavation hazards and the requirements of 29 CFR 1926, Subpart P, Excavations, will be considered as meeting the necessary excavation competent person training for working at SURF. The Contractor shall provide proof of such training as requested by the EHS Office. The Contractor is required to provide a competent person at the job site when excavation work is ongoing. The Contractor shall ensure that the ?Competent Person(s)? can demonstrate that their knowledge and skill-sets match the excavation and protective system(s) that are in place. In addition, all Contractors working in or around excavations shall receive general excavation hazards awareness training.

14.3 SURF Special Emphasis

14.3.1 Buried Services/Utilities

A potential hazard on SURF sites is the presence of underground services and structures such as utility lines (water, electric, sewer, gas, or communication), tanks, various gas and liquid process piping, and sewers. If these services or structures are damaged in any way as a result of excavation activities, there may be injury or death to workers, contamination or interruption of services, disruption of processes, and expensive programmatic delays. In order to prevent any incident regarding underground services, ensure all applicable provisions of the SURF Excavation Permit System are adhered to prior to any surface excavation work at SURF.

14.4 Contractor Responsibilities

14.4.1 The Contractor shall be responsible for the following:

  • Obtaining an approved SURF Excavation Permit from the BM
  • Monitoring/daily inspections of excavation, trenching and shoring operations.
  • Designating a Competent Person, who has had the training to act in this position and providing the competent person the authority to effectively discharge their duties.
  • Ensuring the requirements of this section are effectively communicated and enforced to lower tier sub-contractors.
  • Investigate and report to the SURF Project Manager all incidents involving excavations, trenching and shoring.
15.0 Confined Space

15.1 Regulatory Requirements

The Contractor confined space entry program and the associated work activities conducted in permit-required and non-permit-required confined spaces shall be in accordance with the statutory requirements as listed in Chapter 2 of this Manual.

15.2 SURF Specific Requirements/Permits

In addition to meeting the requirements in Section 15.1, all work activities conducted in permit-required and non-permit-required confined spaces shall meet the following SURF requirements, as applicable.

15.2.1 Confined Space Work at SURF

If known at the time of contracting, SURF will include information on the need for confined space entry in the request for proposal (RFP). SURF will describe the confined space, whether it is permit-required or non-permit-required, the known hazards of the space, and the purpose for entry. SURF will request and review a copy of the Contractor?s written confined space program. SURF will require the Contractor to have a competent confined space person, workers who are properly trained in confined space entry, and all the necessary equipment to perform work in the confined space. Compliance verification is further described in section 13.2.4.

15.2.2 Confined Space Classification

SURF has established a system for classifying (consistent with OSHA definitions) confined spaces as permit-required or non-permit-required based on the actual and/or potential hazards related to entry into the space. Prior to entry, all confined spaces will be evaluated and classified as either permit-required or non-permit based on the actual and/or potential hazards related to entry into the space while the confined space is in its normal operating condition. Confined space classification is performed in advance of entries by SURF EHS.

15.2.2.1 Labeling and Signage

When feasible, identified confined spaces are posted with a sign stating ?Confined Space, Entry by Permit Only? or ?Caution, Non-Permit Confined Space, Contact the SURF Building Manager (BM) Before Entering?. When signage is not feasible Contractors will be informed of the location and classification of known confined spaces.

15.2.3 New or previously unidentified confined spaces

There is a possibility that construction activities may create new confined spaces (such as new utility vaults, manholes, ventilation ducts, tanks, sumps, and/or elevator pits). It is also possible that, during construction, Contractors may encounter a confined space that had not been previously identified. During project design, SURF will attempt to identify situations that may result in the creation of new confined spaces; however it is not always possible to anticipate every potential confined space.

It is the Contractor?s responsibility to watch for new or previously unidentified confined spaces and to inform the SURF project manager whenever new confined spaces are identified or created.

15.2.3.1 Identifying a confined space

All Contractors should be on the lookout for confined spaces. As defined by OSHA a confined space is:

  • Large enough and so configured that an employee can bodily enter and perform assigned work; and
  • Has limited or restricted means for entry or exit (for example, tanks, vessels, silos, storage bins, hoppers, vaults, and pits are spaces that may have limited means of entry.); and
  • Is not designed for continuous employee occupancy.

15.2.3.1 Hazard Recognition

Confined spaces shall be considered hazardous until determined to be otherwise. Hazards will be identified and evaluated by a competent person prior to entry. The Contractor shall be watchful of confined space work activities that may increase hazards ? such as hot work, painting, cleaning or electrical work. Such work may change a non-permit-required confined space into a permit required confined space. The Contractor will continuously evaluate of confined space conditions and will stop work if hazards increase or change. Additional controls shall be implemented to control the new hazards.

15.2.4 SURF Verification of Contractor?s Compliance with Confined Space Entry

SURF will require verification that the Contractor is able to safely perform confined space entries. SURF will verify that the Contractor has the following:

  • a confined space competent person;
  • the entry team/authorized personnel - adequate number of workers to staff an entry team including entry supervisor and that their training is current and documented;
  • functioning, calibrated monitoring equipment and that their staff are familiar with the use of the equipment; and
  • appropriate PPE, ventilation equipment, supplemental lighting if necessary, rescue equipment/plan.

SURF and the Contractor will discuss acceptable entry conditions. SURF may request a copy of the Contractor?s Lock-out Tag-out program if energy isolation is necessary. SURF and the Contractor will agree who?s permit system will be used ? either SURF?s or the Contractor?s. SURF EHS may observe Contractor confined space entries until such time that SURF is comfortable that all performance expectations are being met.

15.2.4.1 Confined Space Entry Controls

Entries into confined spaces shall be controlled either through administrative controls for non-permit confined spaces or through the permit procedure for permit-required confined spaces. Controls for confined space entries include, but are not limited to:

  • Mechanical ventilation;
  • Use of isolation procedures (LOTO);
  • Cleaning of confined space;
  • Electrical precautions;
  • Fire precautions;
  • PPE; and
  • Communication procedures.

15.2.4.2 SURF Confined Space Entry Experience/History Review

SURF EHS shall inform Contractors of SURF experience, if any, with the confined space being entered, by reviewing , Confined Space Evaluations, and associated confined space classification, and previous cancelled permits for the space in question, if available.

15.2.4.3 Contractor Confined Space Post Entry Evaluation Review

Contractors shall inform SURF EHS of their experience with the permit-required confined space following the entry by utilizing the ?Atmospheric Testing Data? section contained in the SURF Confined Space Entry Permit or as part of the Contractor?s accepted Confined Space Entry Permit. Completed SURF permits or copies of the Contractor?s permit shall be made available to SURF EHS.

15.2.5 Confined Space Entry Notification

In general, the following coordination and notification (The SURF Project Manager will be responsible for providing the necessary phone numbers) is required for permit and non-permit required confined spaces prior to entry:

Non-permit Confined Space: Entries shall be coordinated with the Building Manager (BM) or Project Manager (PM).

Permit Required Confined Space: Entries shall be coordinated with the Building Manager (BM), or Project Manager (PM) and the Emergency Response Coordinator (ERC).

The project manager will provide phone numbers and will instruct the Contractor of specific notifications to be made. Exact notification requirements may vary from job to job, particularly in cases of new confined spaces arising during construction.

15.2.6 Contractor Training Requirements

Contractors that are trained in accordance with the requirements identified in 29 CFR 1910.146, Permit Required Confined Spaces will be considered as meeting the necessary confined space entry training requirements for working at SURF. The Contractor shall provide SURF proof of such training upon request.

16.0 Fall Protection

16.1 Regulatory Requirements

The Contractor fall protection program shall be conducted in accordance with the statutory requirements as listed in Chapter 2 of this Manual.

Note: The height allowances permitted for fall protection on Steel Erection (29 CFR 1926.760 and Scaffold Activities (29 CFR 1926.451) do not apply at SURF.

Additionally, all workers who are constructing a leading edge 6 feet or more above lower levels shall be protected from falling by guardrail systems, safety net systems, or personal fall arrest systems. No exceptions allowed.

16.2 SURF Specific Requirements/Permits

In addition to Section 16.1, all work activities and/or potential personnel exposures to unprotected heights of six feet or more shall meet the following SURF requirements as applicable in sections 16.2.1 ? 16.2.4 of this Manual.

16.2.1 Fall Protection Program

Contractors providing services to SURF that meet the applicability as defined in Section 16.1 shall have in place a Fall Protection Program that ensures effective fall protection system(s) are in place anytime workers are exposed to falls at heights of six feet or more. The program shall identify the following key personnel as identified in ANSI Z359.2 who maintain the requisite knowledge and responsibility for the successful implementation of the program at the project:

  • Program Administrator
  • Qualified Person
  • Competent Person

Additionally, the Contractor shall ensure personnel that are required to utilize fall protection meet the qualification of an ?Authorized Person? as defined by ANSI Z359.2. Note: Employees trained by a competent person in accordance with the requirements identified in 29 CFR 1926.503, Fall Protection Training Requirements will be considered as meeting the necessary fall protection training for an ?Authorized Worker.?

The Contractors fall protection program shall contain a Site Specific Fall Protection Plan that outlines how the Contractor intends to comply with the requirements of this chapter. The requirements for the plan are outlined in Section 16.2.1.1.

16.2.1.1 Fall Protection Plan

Contractors shall develop and submit a fall protection plan (FPP) to the SURF Project Manager and the EHS POC for concurrence prior to the start of work. The plan shall be prepared by a qualified person or competent person for the Contractor and developed specifically for the activity and/or project where the work will occur. The FPP shall be documented and contain the following elements at a minimum:

  • Project/Job location/date(s).
  • Project/Job description.
  • Name of the Contractor Fall Protection Program Administrator, Qualified Person and the Competent Person(s) responsible for fall protection on this site/project.
  • Fall Hazard Analysis(s) (FHA) conducted in accordance with section16.2.1.2 for each activity or similar activity type/grouping associated with the project. (Note: For projects that cannot identify all activities that will require fall protection during the life of the project, the Contractor shall ensure that a FHA is performed, reviewed and accepted as required by SURF and attached to the project Site Specific Fall Protection Plan prior to performing the work).
  • Identify the means to be utilized for the prompt rescue of employees in the event of a fall as necessary.
  • Provide verification of training certification for personnel affected by the fall protection plan.
  • Signature of the competent person preparing the plan and the Contractor Site Safety Representative.
  • Document how the requirements of this plan will be flowed down to lower-tier sub-contractors.

16.2.1.2 Fall Hazard Analysis

A fall hazard analysis (FHA) shall be conducted for each activity or similar activity type/grouping prior to the start of work and shall be included in the FPP or as part of the job hazard analysis (JHA) for the subject activity and/or definable feature of work. The FHA shall be performed by a competent person and/or qualified person. This analysis shall identify one or more methods to eliminate or mitigate fall hazards. The analysis shall be comprehensive, thorough, and address the following elements:

  • Describe the fall hazards associated with the proposed activity.
  • Identify the controls that will be in place to eliminate or mitigate the fall hazard. The controls shall achieve 100% continuous fall protection. The selection of controls shall be in accordance with Section 16.2.1.3, Fall Protection Hierarchy of Control and Mitigation Methods
  • As necessary, identify the means to be utilized for the prompt rescue of employees in the event of a fall.

The Contractor may perform this analysis by using a Fall Hazard Analysis form or this analysis may conducted and included as part of the JHA prepared for the subject project/activity. A copy of a SURF Fall Hazard Analysis form can be obtained the SURF EHS Office. The FHA and/or JHA shall be revised and accepted by SURF when changes occur that render the analysis obsolete.

16.2.1.3 Fall Protection Hierarchy of Control and Mitigation Methods

The Contractor shall incorporate the following hierarchy of control when selecting methods to eliminate or mitigate fall hazards:

  • Hazard Elimination. First consider eliminating fall hazards. This might involve moving the work surface to ground level or changing a task so that workers do not approach the fall hazard.
  • Passive Fall Protection. Take actions that isolate or effectively separate the hazard from workers, such as installing floor coverings or handrail/guardrail systems.
  • Fall Restraint. Establish a travel restraint system that prevents a worker from accessing a position from which he or she could fall.
  • Fall Arrest. Configure a PFAS designed to arrest a fall after it has begun.
  • Administrative Fall Protection System. Establish controlled-access zones and safety-monitoring systems. Generally these controls are considered ineffective and are prohibited at SURF, unless specifically authorized by the EHS Office.

16.2.2 Fall Protection Equipment System Requirements

Fall protection equipment and systems shall be used in accordance with the manufacturer?s recommendations and the requirements of this procedure. Misapplication or use of this equipment in a way contrary to those requirements is prohibited. A competent person shall supervise the work and verify that the fall protection system is properly established and maintained.

16.2.2.1 Personal Fall Arrest System Strength Requirements

Contractors shall ensure that the strength and testing requirements for personal fall arrest systems, components and subsystems shall comply with the provisions of ANSI Z359.1, Safety Requirements for Personal Fall Arrest Systems, Subsystems and Components. All other applicable fall protection equipment and system requirements shall at a minimum meet the requirements of ANSI A10.32 Standard for Personal Fall Protection used in Construction and Demolition Operations.

16.2.2.2 Personal Fall Arrest System (PFAS) Inspections & Storage

Routine Inspection. PFAS equipment shall be inspected by the authorized worker using the equipment prior to each use. Equipment inspections shall follow the guidelines established by the manufacturer Damaged or questionable equipment shall be immediately removed from service and tagged accordingly. Equipment that cannot be repaired shall be destroyed.

Post-Fall Inspection. PFAS components subject to a fall shall be immediately removed from service and destroyed or returned to the manufacturer for inspection, repair, and re-certification. Contact the manufacturer to determine the available options.

Periodic Inspection. A competent person, other than the user, shall periodically inspect PFAS equipment. This inspection shall follow the intervals and guidelines established by the manufacturer but shall not be greater than six months. The results of these inspections shall be recorded and available for review by SURF.

Equipment Storage. Fall protection equipment shall be stored in a manner that protects it from exposure to adverse conditions, such as ultraviolet light or harsh weather, that could result in damage or diminished performance and/or other specific requirements established by the manufacturer.

16.2.2.3 Safety Net Systems

The use of safety net systems as the means of fall protection is not anticipated at SURF unless used in conjunction with other accepted means of fall protection and compliance with other regulatory requirements.(i.e., 29 CFR 1926, Subpart R, Steel Erection). Contact the SURF EHS Office for additional information on safety net systems.

16.2.2.4 Portable Ladders

Fall protection is not required when using portable ladders in compliance with the following requirements.

  • Portable ladders shall be set up and used in accordance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and manufacturer requirements and be a minimum Type I, Heavy Duty Classification. Light and medium duty class ladders are prohibited.
  • Extension ladders shall be tied/secured off to prevent displacement.
  • Ladder users shall maintain three-point control (three limbs maintain contact on the ladder), and that their body remains centered between the side rails.
  • Ladder users are not subject to a fall to a level lower than the base of ladder they are working from.

16.2.3 Contractor Training Requirements

Contractors that are trained in accordance with the requirements identified in 29 CFR 1926, Subpart M will be considered as meeting the necessary fall protection training requirements for working at SURF. The Contractor is required to provide authorized and competent persons at the job site as defined in ANSI Z359.0.

16.3 SURF Special Emphasis

16.3.1 Personal Fall Arrest System (PFAS)

The Contractor shall ensure that PFAS are employed when conventional systems are not feasible to achieve 100% continuous fall protection at working heights of six feet or more. If PFAS?s or conventional fall protection systems are not feasible, this justification shall be documented in the fall hazard analysis outlined in Section 16.3.1.2 and accepted by the SURF Project Manager and EHS POC.

17.0 Hoisting and Rigging

17.1 Regulatory Requirements

All Contractor H&R activities shall be conducted in accordance with the statutory requirements as listed in Chapter 2 of this Manual.

Exception: This Chapter does not include requirements for powered industrial trucks (PIT).

17.2 SURF Specific Requirements/Permits

In addition to Section 17.1, all Contractor hoisting and rigging (H&R) activities shall meet the following specific SURF requirements as applicable.

Contractors bringing H&R equipment on site shall be able to demonstrate that their equipment is properly maintained, in safe operating condition, and that operators are experienced and qualified. Contractor crane operators are not permitted to operate SURF H&R equipment. All H&R equipment brought on site shall be in new or like new condition free of hydraulic or oil leaks.

17.2.1 Operator Training and Certification

Contractors who provide and operate H&R equipment, as part of a construction project or similar activity, shall provide:

  • Proof of Training/Certification: SURF requires proof of training, such as an NCCCO license or other SURF accepted licenses/certification. SURF recognizes the NCCCO national certification program as demonstrating that the certified H&R operator meets OSHA?s and SURF?s requirements for crane operator proficiency. This certification/license shall be current for the crane type they will be operating. (i.e., Mobile Crane Operator, Tower Crane Operator) Any other forms of crane certification must be accepted by the SURF POC.
  • Medical Requirements: Crane operators shall complete a medical certification examination at least every three years in accordance with ASME B.30.5. A valid medical card shall be provided to document this requirement.

17.2.2 Hoisting and Rigging Operating Requirements

17.2.2.1 Planning

The Contractor shall evaluate and plan H&R operations in advance. A competent person shall identify the hazards and determine the controls necessary to maintain an acceptable level of risk. A Hoisting and Rigging Lift Plan is required for complex and critical lifts. This plan shall be documented using a Hoisting and Rigging Lift Plan or similar plan accepted by SURF.

17.2.2.2 Critical and Complex Lifts

The Contractor shall utilize a Hoisting and Rigging Lift Plan or other SURF accepted equivalent plan to document critical and complex lifts. All critical and/or complex lift plans require the review and concurrence of the SURF Project Manager and EHS POC. If the critical lift involves lifting personnel or work platforms the plan must be approved by the EHS Director.

Critical lifts are defined as lifts for which any of the following conditions exist:

  • The weight of the lift exceeds 80 percent of the crane?s rated capacity in the configuration that will be used during the lift. Exception: During steel erection, a critical lift is defined as a lift that exceeds 75 percent of the crane?s rated capacity or requires the use of more than one crane.
  • Lifts involving non-routine or difficult rigging arrangements or where loads will require exceptional care in handling because of size, weight, close-tolerance installation or high susceptibility to damage.
  • Hoisting of personnel with a crane or derrick. (requires EHS Director approval)
  • If the item being lifted were to be damaged or upset, it could result in a release of hazardous material into the environment or the release of airborne concentrations that could exceed established occupational exposure limits.
  • The item being lifted is unique and, if damaged, would be irreplaceable or not repairable and is vital to a system, facility, or project operation.
  • The cost to replace or repair the item being lifted, or the delay in operations of having the item damaged, would have a negative impact on the facility, organization, or construction project to the extent that it would affect project commitments.
  • The item, although non-critical, is to be lifted above or in close proximity to a critical item or component.

Complex Lifts are defined as lifts that present logistical difficulties or lift coordination complications, thus requiring a higher level of planning and execution. Complex lifts may involve the following:

  • A lift involving multiple cranes.
  • Axial rotation of an object in the vertical plane or other complex movement of the load.
  • A lift where the behavior of the load while in suspension is questionable.

17.2.2.3 Pre-Lift Meeting

Prior to performing any lift, the Contractor shall conduct a pre-lift meeting with workers involved in the work activity. The following items shall be reviewed:

  • The scope and sequence of work
  • Roles and responsibilities
  • Hazards and controls
  • Other relevant information identified in the Hoisting and Rigging Lift Plan.

When performing lifts designated as critical and/or complex lifts, this meeting shall be documented.

17.2.2.4 Communication

The Contractor shall require the use of ANSI B30.5 standard hand signals or voice/radio communications during the course of crane operations.

17.2.2.5 Area Access Control

The Contractor shall cordon off or manually control the lift area to prevent access by unauthorized workers by deploying barricades and warning signs and/or utilizing personnel to monitor and control access to the area. The Contractor shall cordon off the swing radius area for mobile cranes with warning tape or other barricade apparatus, such as cones.

17.2.2.6 Protection of People

Do not place people in jeopardy by moving a suspended load over people or an occupied section of a facility. Work beneath a suspended load is prohibited unless the load is supported by cribbing, jacks, or a solid footing that safely supports the entire weight. All personnel shall remain clear of moving and shifting loads.

17.2.2.7 Rated Load Capacity

The rated load capacity of monorails and other H&R structural elements, such as jibs, shall match, at a minimum, the rated load capacity of a hoist placed upon it.

Know the weight of the object being lifted or use a dynamometer or load cell to determine the weight. If the weight of the load is unknown, a minimum 50% safety factor shall be employed. This means that the crane or hoist, slings, and rigging hardware shall have twice the capacity of the estimated load.

Fully extend outriggers or reduce the cranes rated load capacity as directed and allowed by the crane manufacturers operating Guide.

17.2.2.8 Electrical Distribution Lines

Watch for overhead electrical distribution and transmission lines and maintain a safe working clearance of at least 10 feet or as required from energized electrical lines. Any overhead wire shall be considered to be

energized unless and until the SURF Electrical Engineer or the electrical utility authorities indicate that it is not an energized line. Exercise caution when working near overhead lines having long spans as they tend to move laterally or vertically due to the wind, which could cause them to breach the safety zone.

17.2.3 Environmental Factors

Environmental factors, such as weather and terrain can adversely affect a lift. When performing outdoor lifts, the following environmental factors shall be considered:

17.2.3.1 High Winds

Lifts shall be suspended if prevailing wind conditions may adversely affect the lift. As a general rule, this applies to wind speeds of 25 miles per hour or more. However, based on the nature of the load ? such as size, surface area, or fragility ? a lower wind speed limit may warrant suspension of a lift. The H&R operator and/or lift master shall evaluate behavior of the load in prevailing winds and the stresses placed upon H&R equipment to the extent necessary to safely complete the lift.

17.2.3.2 Freezing Surfaces

Check surface conditions to determine if the load may be frozen to the ground. Do not use H&R equipment to ?break loose? a load that is frozen to the ground. This subjects H&R equipment to severe and unintended loads.

17.2.3.3 Ground Conditions

Check ground conditions around the hoisting equipment for proper support, including settling under and around outriggers, ground water accumulation or other similar conditions.

17.2.4 Crane Inspection, Maintenance & Testing

17.2.4.1 Crane Initial Inspection

Prior to being placed into service, all Contractor owned and/or rented cranes shall undergo an initial inspection. A Crane Inspection Checklist shall be utilized to document these inspections. When qualified third party inspections are performed to meet the requirements of this inspection, a copy of the third party inspection shall be attached to the Crane Inspection Checklist which will satisfy the crane physical inspection portion of the checklist. SURF EHS may elect to oversee the Contractor?s initial inspection of the crane.

All crane inspection deficiencies shall be identified and documented and the safety implications shall be determined. The Contractor shall maintain the original copy of the inspection report and provide a copy to the SURF Project Manager and EHS. The crane owner shall take immediate action to correct the identified deficiencies.

  • Mobile Boom Cranes: For wheel mounted or crawler type boom cranes, the Contractor competent person shall inspect the crane. The Contractor may elect to utilize a qualified independent 3rd party inspector to meet this requirement.
  • Lattice Boom or Tower Cranes: Lattice boom and tower cranes require a thorough inspection prior to being placed into service on SURF property. If the Contractor is utilizing a lattice boom or tower crane, the crane shall undergo a thorough initial inspection prior to the start of work by a qualified independent 3rd party inspector. The Contractor shall bear the expense of this inspection.

17.2.4.2 Daily Pre-Operational Inspections

H&R operators shall visually inspect the following items each day or prior to first use if the hoist has not been in regular service. Records are required.

  • Functional operating mechanisms for maladjustment interfering with proper operation
  • Deterioration or leakage in lines, tanks, valves, drain pumps, and other parts of air systems
  • Hooks for cracks, deformation, latch engagement, and damage from chemicals
  • Hoist rope for significant wear, kinking, crushing, bird-caging, corrosion, or broken strands or wires
  • Hoist chains, including end connections, for excessive wear, twist, distorted links interfering with proper function, or stretch beyond manufacturer?s recommendations
  • Primary hoist upper-limit device for proper operation.

Deficiencies: H&R operators or other designated qualified workers shall examine deficiencies and determine whether the equipment should be removed from service or if a more detailed inspection is required.

17.2.4.3 Monthly Inspections

Cranes active on the site for periods extending beyond 1 month shall receive monthly documented inspections. The competent person shall at a minimum visually inspect the following items for damage, wear, or other deficiency that might reduce capacity or adversely affect the safety of the crane.

  • Critical items such as brakes and crane hooks.
  • Hoist ropes.

Signed and dated inspection records shall be kept on file and shall be readily available. Before the crane is returned to service, correct deficiencies that could reduce its capacity or adversely affect its safety.

17.2.4.4 Annual Inspections

Annual crane inspections shall conform to the requirements identified in 29CFR1926, Subpart N and as recommended by the manufacturer. Documentation of these inspections shall be available for review by SURF.

17.2.4.5 Idle Equipment

Hoisting equipment that is idle for a period of greater than one month (fully operational but not used) does not require monthly inspections. Idle hoisting equipment shall be removed from service and tagged with an administrative ?CAUTION ? Do Not Operate? label to alert potential users of the start-up inspection requirements to include the requirements contained in the daily and monthly inspections. Documentation of these inspections shall be available for review by SURF.

17.2.4.6 Maintenance

A preventive maintenance program shall be established and based on the recommendation of the crane manufacturer. If equipment maintenance procedures deviate from published manufacturer's recommendations, the alternate procedures shall be approved in advance by the manufacturer or another qualified person and be kept readily available. Dated maintenance records should be kept readily available to appointed personnel. Replacement parts shall be at least equal to the original manufacturer?s specifications.

17.2.4.7 Rated Load Test

Prior to initial use, all cranes in which load sustaining parts have been modified, replaced, or repaired shall be load-tested by a qualified inspector or under the direction of that inspector. All rated load tests shall be performed in accordance with manufacturer?s recommendations.

17.2.5 Rigging Safety Requirements

17.2.5.1 Rigging Component Procurement

Rigging components shall be obtained from reliable sources and shall be rated for H&R applications. Do not use damaged or suspect rigging. Chinese shackles are not permitted to be used.

17.2.5.2 Storage and Maintenance

Rigging equipment shall be stored and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer?s recommendations. Protect rigging hardware from weathering and harsh environments. Rust, corrosion, and/or UV damage can degrade rigging performance.

17.2.5.3 Labeling

Rigging hardware shall be labeled for identification purposes with a durable tag.

17.2.5.4 Rigging Safe Work Practices

The Contractor shall ensure that the following safe work practices are utilized when rigging a load:

  • Determine the weight of the load. Do not guess. The weight of the load shall be within the rated load capacity of the rigging.
  • Determine the proper size for slings and components.
  • Select slings so that the rated load capacity is adequate when the appropriate de-ratings are applied based on sling angle and/or hitch angle considerations (chocker angle de-rating).
  • Verify that shouldered eyebolts are installed in accordance with the manufacturer?s recommendations. Beware of side pull applications. Eyebolts shall be de-rated when subject to side loads.
  • Do not use shoulderless eyebolts for lifting purposes.
  • Use safety hoist rings (swivel eyes) as a preferred substitute for eyebolts when possible.
  • Pad sharp and small diameter edges to protect slings. Machinery foundations or angle-iron edges may not feel sharp to the touch but could cut into rigging when under load. Dense foam, tire rubber, or other dense, pliable materials may be suitable for padding.
  • Do not use slings, eyebolts, shackles, hooks, or other hardware that appear to have been cut, welded, brazed, or is otherwise suspect.
  • Determine the center of gravity and balance the load before moving it. Keep the attachment points of rigging accessories as far above the center of gravity as possible.
  • Lift the load initially just a few inches to test the rigging and balance.
  • Place blocks beneath loads prior to setting down the load to allow removal of the sling, where applicable.

17.2.6 Inspection Criteria for Slings, Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices and Rigging Hardware

17.2.6.1 Prior to Use Inspection

At the beginning of each shift or prior to use, if it has not been in regular service, the competent person shall visually inspect the rigging equipment (slings, below the hook devices and rigging hardware) in accordance with the appropriate ASME/ANSI standard or according to the manufacturer?s instruction, whichever is more stringent. Defective rigging equipment shall be removed from service and destroyed to prevent reuse.

17.2.6.2 Periodic Inspections

Rigging equipment shall be inspected periodically in accordance with the appropriate ASME/ANSI standard or according to the manufacturer?s instruction, whichever is more stringent. This inspection shall be performed by a qualified inspector and have a documented inspection history, with records readily available.

17.2.7 Personnel Hoisting

17.2.7.1 Personnel Platform Lift Plan

The use of H&R equipment to hoist workers onto a platform is generally prohibited, except when the use of a conventional means of reaching the work area, such as a ladder, scaffold, or man lift, would be more hazardous or is not possible because of structural design or worksite conditions. Personnel lifts shall be properly planned and executed. The SURF EHS Director shall authorize this type of activity in advance of the lift. A Personnel Platform Lift Plan or other SURF EHS accepted equivalent plan shall be utilized to document these lifts.

17.2.7.2 Pre-Lift Meeting

A pre-lift meeting shall be conducted prior to initiating a personnel lift. Workers involved in the work activity shall attend the pre-lift meeting, including Contractors, man basket occupants, and the H&R operator.

17.3 SURF Special Emphasis

17.3.1 Department of Energy Hoisting and Rigging Standard

SURF adheres to the Department of Energy (DOE) Hoisting and Rigging Standard as a best management practice. The Hoisting and Rigging Standard is a DOE-wide consensus standard for rigging, crane, and hoist operations. It references applicable industry standards and regulations governing this type of work. The Hoisting and Rigging Standard contains detailed information on H&R inspection, testing, maintenance, and operational requirements.

18.0 Building Surface Penetrations

18.1 Regulatory Requirements

The Contractor?s building surface penetration activities shall be conducted in accordance with the statutory requirements as listed in Chapter 2 of this Manual.

18.2 SURF Specific Requirements/Permits

In addition to the requirements in Section 18.1, the Contractor shall conduct surface penetrations in accordance with the following SURF requirements.

Note: All outside excavations including trenching, grading, or drilling activities shall be performed in accordance with Chapter 14, Excavations.

18.2.1 Surface Penetrations

A surface penetration at SURF is defined as an opening made by drilling, cutting, hammering, or otherwise piercing a wall, floor, ceiling, roof or other building surface. Contractors shall ensure that the provisions and necessary steps are in place to provide protection against contact with unseen enclosed electrical lines, gas lines, waste lines, water lines, high pressure lines, or other utilities that, if disturbed, may injure workers or damage equipment.

The Contractor will be responsible for providing all the required materials, personnel and protective equipment necessary to conduct safe surface penetrations.

18.2.1.1 Surface Penetration Permit, Existing SURF Buildings and Facilities

Contractors conducting surface penetrations in existing SURF buildings and facilities shall perform this work activity in accordance with the SURF Surface Penetration Permit System. Prior to performing any building surface penetrations, the Contractor shall coordinate the activity through the SURF Project Manager and existing BM. The SURF Project Manager/BM will issue the Surface Penetration Permit to the Contractor.

In accordance with the requirements of the permit, the Contractor shall perform an initial evaluation to include a walk-down of the area with the SURF Project Manager/BM. The walk-down shall identify:

  • Any visible indications that utilities and equipment might be present.
  • Any utilities and equipment that might be disturbed during the work activity.

Pre-Approved Surface Penetration Methods

Based on the results of the walk-down, the SURF Project Manager/BM will make a determination if the Contractor work activity falls within the category of a ?Pre-approved surface penetration method?. SURF pre-approved methods include the following:

  • Hanging pictures or board where the length of the nail or screw will not fully penetrate the wall material.
  • Penetrations into masonry block wall that do not exceed ?? in depth.
  • Penetrations into steel building sheeting that will not exceed the thickness of the material
  • Penetrations in pre-cast tilt-up concrete walls to mount signs and facility accessories. The penetration cannot exceed the thickness of the wall.
  • Penetrations in drywall, sheetrock, steel sheeting, or similar construction material with a drill bit fitted with a stop to prevent penetration beyond the depth of the material. Once a hole is made just through the material, use a fiber optic scope to verify the absence of utilities prior to proceeding with work.
  • Penetrations in drywall, sheetrock, or similar construction material with a utility knife where the blade is adjusted to prevent penetration beyond the depth of the material. If the size of the opening does not allow for visual verification, use a fiber optic scope to verify the absence of utilities prior to proceeding with work.
  • Penetrations in drywall, sheetrock, or similar construction material with a non-conductive object. If the size of the opening does not allow for visual verification, use a fiber optic scope to verify the absence of utilities prior to proceeding with work.
  • Penetrations in drywall, sheetrock, or similar construction material with a laminate trimmer with the cutting bit adjusted to prevent penetration beyond the depth of the material. If the size of the opening does not allow for visual verification, use a fiber optic scope to verify the absence of utilities prior to proceeding with work.
  • Penetrations into a single layer of drywall, sheetrock, or similar construction material where both sides can be visually inspected to verify the absence of utilities that may be disturbed

If it is determined that the surface penetration meets the requirements of a pre-approved method, then the SURF Project Manager/BM will issue the permit to the Contractor. The permit may include additional Contractor project controls and work instructions as deemed necessary by the BM.

Non Pre-Approved Surface Penetration Methods

If the surface penetration does not meet the criteria for a ?Pre-approved surface penetration method?, then one or more of following utility locate measures as determined by the SURF BM, Project Manager and EHS point of contact shall be applied:

  • Review facility and the utility drawings.
  • Perform nondestructive examination of the area with utility locate equipment.
  • Interview individuals involved with the construction of the area to identify how utilities were laid out.
  • Use typical construction practices as an indicator of the potential for utility system to be disturbed.
  • Other as applicable

The Contractor shall incorporate the following electrical safety precautions as required by the permit:

  • GFCI when using corded electrical power tools. Note: A CFGI is not required if a drill interrupter/ stop is used.
  • Drill interrupter/stop.
  • Wear dielectric gloves rated for the voltage:
  • Eye protection:
  • Dielectric mats.
  • Wear dielectric rubber outer boots over required foot protection when using water coolant or in a wet environment.

When utilities have been detected within the general area that the penetrations will be performed,

the Contractor shall incorporate the following project controls and instructions as applicable and defined in the permit:

  • Relocate planned penetration location.
  • Maintain the distances from the identified and marked utilities as defined in the permit.
  • Lock out/tag out the detected utilities prior to proceeding with the surface penetration activities.

In all instances , the Contractor shall immediately stop work if:

  • Unexpected utilities are encountered
  • The tools encounter unexpected resistance
  • Utilities are damaged during the work activity.

18.2.1.2 Surface Penetration Permit, New Building Construction

Contractors performing building penetrations in or on new building construction shall utilize their own surface penetration permit system that meets or exceeds the requirements of section 18.2.1.1. The Contractor shall utilize the permit when construction activities such as drilling, cutting, hammering, or otherwise piercing a wall, floor, ceiling, roof or other building surface. that have a possibility of contacting or penetrating energized unseen enclosed electrical lines, gas lines, waste lines, water lines, high pressure lines, or other utilities that, if disturbed, may injure workers or damage equipment.

The Contractor surface penetration permit system shall be included as part of the CEHS Project Plan when applicable to project scope.

19.0 Reference and Related Documents

19.1 Reference Documents

  • Emergency Response Plan
  • Emergency Reporting System Flowchart
  • Medical Facility Location Map
  • Construction Safety Languages
  • OSHA 29 CFR 1926
  • OSHA 29 CFR 1910
  • MSHA 30 CFR
  • CEHS Program Deliverables - Required Documents & Approvals
  • CEHSP
  • JHA
  • Hot Work Permit
  • Contractor?s Check-in Log
  • Tool Box Talk Attendance
  • First Report of Injury/Incident
  • Confined Space Entry Permit
  • Excavation Permit
  • Daily Trenching Log
  • Building Surface Penetration Permit
  • 5 Point Card
  • Crane Monthly Inspection Form
  • Rigging Inspection Forms
    • Synthetic Web Slings
    • Wire Rope Slings
  • Weekly EHS Report Template
  • Energized Electrical Work Permit
  • Lead Compliance Plan